The following technical articles are available for download from the ARRL Technical Information Service:

These are the articles that have been selected by the ARRL Lab staff for the web pages of the ARRL Technical Information Service at http://www.arrl.org/tis. They are primarily from QST, with some QEX articles, some reprints from older ARRL publications. TIS pages consist of a number of these articles plus links to other related sites.

A number of these articles are on the ARRL members-only site.  For information about becoming an ARRL member, to get access to these articles, QST magazine, a wide range of other ARRL member benefits and the opportunity to help with ARRL’s ongoing work for amateur radio, visit http://www.arrl.org/join.html.

Antennas 
Antenna Articles for the New Ham:

· Wire Antennas for the Beginner (1,781,534 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1983, pp. 33-38
Every ham knows how to make and install wire antennas. But if you've never done it, you probably have a few questions. Here are some answers.

· Ground-plane Antennas for 144, 222, 449 MHz (109,309 bytes, PDF file)
ARRL Antenna Book, 18th Edition, pp. 18-16 to 18.17
(If you can't find aluminum rod or wire or welding rods, try metal coat hangers - they work too.)

· Build a Portable Groundplane Antenna (1,206,418 bytes, PDF File)
QST July 1991, pp. 33-34
Need a better antenna for your hand-held radio? Here's the answer.

· Feeding Your Station (1,743,425 bytes, PDF File)
QST December 1983, pp. 20-23
Fat coaxial line, skinny cable, open-wire feeders or 300-ohm ribbon line - the correct choice can save the beginner a few dollars while helping to ensure maximum performance.
Feedback: QST April 1984, p. 51. There is an error in Table 1. The capacitance of RG-11A/U is 20.5 pF/ft, not 0.5 pF/ft as shown.
Feedback: The first formula in note 1 should read m = ft x 0.3048

· A 15-Meter Beam "On A Budget" (602,286 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1971, pp. 41-43
Even the simplest beam can be expensive due to the cost of aluminum tubing. Here's a solution.

· Choosing An Antenna (406,416 bytes, PDF file)
QST January 1962, pp. 25-29, 140, 142
As the title indicates, this article is written to help the newcomer decide on the kind of antenna to select for his station.

· The Arial Performers of the Radio Circuits Part 1 (999,273 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1978, pp. 42-46
Antennas are as different as the hams who use them.

· The Arial Performers of the Radio Circuits Part 2 (1,876,039 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1978, pp. 44-48
Why do some antennas get out better than others? Here are some practical answers plus all you need to know for building a simple coax-fed, half-wave dipole.

· What Does Your SWR Cost You? (149,201 bytes, PDF file)
QST January 1979, pp. 19-20
Wondering whether to spend a fine day with the YL or with your antenna? This article may help you decide.

· Antenna Accessories for the Beginner (1,786,359 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1979, pp. 15-19
How many antenna gadgets are needed to put out a good signal? Perhaps your station is over-equipped, or maybe you've been shortchanging yourself on accessories

General Antenna Articles:

· HF Amplifiers versus Antennas--One Ham's Opinion (39,999 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1998, pp. 54-56
The solution to "getting out better" is not necessarily "more power".

· Low Power, Crummy Antenna (293,108 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1998, pp. 57-59
A major part of the fun of amateur radio is putting together a station that works from stuff you have just laying around. Antennas lend themselves to this practice nicely.

· Antenna and Tower Safety (15,694 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 2001, p. 91

· “What’s Up Top”
QST June 1960, pp. 38-40
Crud and rust can be a real detriment to the performance of your antenna. Here are some procedures to make it look (and work) like new again.

· Stacking Yagi Antennas
By what distance should stacked Yagi’s be separated?

· Beam Talk for the Layman (members-only) (263,249 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 1958, pp.35-37
Step-by-step tuning of a gamma matched Yagi antenna and other thoughts on installation.

· Sound-Card Antenna Measurements and Other Useful Techniques (members-only) (1,560,065 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX Jan/Feb 2002, pp. 33-46
Measure antenna and receiver performance and record results, even when you are not present, using your computer’s sound card.

· Tower and Antenna Wind Loading as a Function of Height (192,267 bytes, PDF file)
QEX July/August 2001, pp. 23-33

· A Low-Loss VHF/UHF Bias Tee (members-only) (279,405 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX May/June 2002, pp. 52-54
A simple circuit that lets you superimpose DC control voltage onto the transmission line without altering the RF characteristics.

· Tower and Antenna Wind Loading as a Function of Height (192,267 bytes, PDF file)
QEX July/August 2001, pp. 23-33

· An Inexpensive External GPS Antenna (253,745 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 2002, pp. 36-39
An easy to build antenna for your GPS unit for better reception.

·  

HF Beam/Yagi Antennas:

· Simple Offset Feeding of Wire-Element Beams (members-only) (209,735 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1999, pp. 45-46
This approach to matching a feed line to an antenna uses the antenna itself as an impedance transformer.

· Why A Beam Antenna? (1,221,309 bytes, PDF file)
QST January 1972, pp. 36-39
Some basic antenna information for the newcomer about Yagi antennas including a tutorial on antenna gain and construction of a 15-meter beam antenna.

· Simple Gain Antenna for the Beginner (778,544 bytes, PDF file)
QST August 1981, pp. 32-35
A tutorial on the Yagi antenna with construction of a two element beam for 10-, 15-, or 20-meters.

· The Building-Supply Yagi (members-only) (920,911 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST March 1991, pp. 22-24
Here's a cheap, easy-to-assemble, two-element Yagi you can build for 10, 12, or 15 meters.

· Two on 10 (237,149 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1999, pp. 67-69
A two element 10-Meter beam designed for portable or permanent installation. (Additional information)

· A Two-Element Duoband Beam (members-only) (880,439 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST April 1993, pp. 36-37
Explore the 12- and 17-meter bands with this small, lightweight Yagi.

· A 15-Meter Beam On A Budget (members-only) (602,286 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST February 1971, pp. 41-43
A two element beam made from electrician’s thin wall tubing.

· Basic Beams for 12 and 17 Meters (members-only) (1,494,442 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST August 2000, pp. 57-62
Some well-designed and easy-to-build antennas for the 12- and 17-meter bands.

· A Three Element Lightweight Monobander for 14 MHz (members-only) (178,829 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 2001, pp. 28-31
A portable easy to build light weight antenna

· A Portable 2-Element Triband Yagi (257,252 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 2001, pp. 35-37
This novel wire antenna is great for permanent or portable, QRO or QRP, and old-timer or beginner operation.

HF Dipole Antennas:

· The NJQRP Squirt (151,957 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 2001, pp. 40-43
A reduced-size 80-meter antenna designed for small lots, portable use, and a fine companion for QRP or the Warbler PSK31 Transceiver .

· The Monoband HF Dipole Antenna (89,852 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1993, p. 64
Construction and installation of a dipole for 80-, 40-, 15-, or 10-meters.

· Antenna Here is a Dipole (1,677,174 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1991, pp. 23-26
Step-by-step tutorial on constructing dipoles for any one of the HF bands from 1.8 to 28.4MHz.

· The Bent Dipole (members-only) (25,905 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1997, pp. 56-57
Although not strictly a "project" article, it does answer a common question. "Can I arrange the legs on my dipole to fit my yard?"

· Feeding Dipole Antennas (members-only) (1,173,201 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST July 1991, pp. 22-24
A continuation of the above article covering open-wire feed line, coaxial feed line and baluns..

· A Modest Multiband Antenna (members-only) (935,012 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST July 1994, pp. 68-69
Construction of the 135 foot, ladder-line fed, multiband dipole. This antenna requires a transmatch (antenna tuner). (See - Transmatch/Antenna Tuner).

· Five Bands, No Tuner (members-only) (11,448 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST June 1995, p. 59
A multiband dipole for 40-, 20-, 17-, 12- and 10-meters. This one is fed with ladder-line, a balun and coax and does not require an antenna tuner.

· The Off-Center-Fed Dipole Revisited: A Broadband, Multiband Antenna (members-only) (658,195 bytes, PDF file)
QST August 1990, pp. 28-34
A discussion of the Windom and the off-center-fed dipole as multiband antennas.

· Broad-Band 80-Meter Antenna (members-only) (257,091 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST December 1980, pp. 36-37. Feedback, QST February 1981, p. 46.
Construction and theory of operation of the "cage" broadband 80-meter antenna popular in the 1920s.
Note: ARRLWeb: The "Cage" is Back! W1AW Installs New/Old Antenna.

· The Clothesline Antenna (members-only) (96,738 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST July 1998, pp. 56-58
A somewhat camouflaged, ladder-line, balun, coax fed multiband antenna. Requires antenna tuner.

· Multiband Dipoles Compared (26,496 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1996, pp. 73-74
A comparison of different multi-band dipole techniques.

· The G5RV Multiband Antenna ... Up-to-Date (members-only) (445,845 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
ARRL Antenna Compendium Volume 1, pp. 86-90

· The Off-Center-Fed Long-Wire (members-only)
W1FB's Antenna Notebook, 1987, pp. 36-38 Members Only
This is a simple wire multiband antenna that can be fed with either coax or ladder-line and can be made to operate well from 160- to 10-meters with an antenna tuner.

· QRP-France with a "Junk Box Shorty Forty" Antenna (members-only) (128,512 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 2001, pp. 66-68
A short center-loaded 40-meter dipole for portable QRP

· A Portable Twin-Lead 20-Meter Dipole (members-only) Members Only
QST February 2002, p. 36

· K8SYL’s 75 and 10-Meter Dipole (members-only) (240,475 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 2002, pp. 32-34

· The K4VX Linear-Loaded Dipole for 7 MHz (200,463 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 2002, pp. 40-42
A short but efficient 40-meter dipole

HF J-Pole Antennas:

· A Simple Nondirectional Antenna for Ten Meters (233,289 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1950, pp. 16-17, 88
Easy to build J-Pole antenna for restricted space.

· Flagpole J for 10 Meters (members-only) (1,221,615 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 1989
Hide your antenna in plane sight.

HF Loop Antennas:

· Small Loop Antenna for 160 Meters (members-only) (624,185 bytes, PDF file) QST June 1993, pp. 32-34
Effective, low-profile 160-meter antennas present a formidable challenge. Here’s one made form 1 inch copper tubing.

· Honey, I Shrunk the Antenna (1,405,133 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1993, pp. 34-35, 39
Three and a half to four foot loop antennas for several of the HF bands from 160- to 10-meters.

· You Can Build: A Compact Loop Antenna for 30 through 12 Meters (members-only) (1,135,815 bytes, PDF file) QST May 1994, pp. 33-36
A low-profile, compact antenna made from copper tubing and using a small D.C. motor to remotely tune the capacitor.

· A Gain Antenna for 28 MHz (members-only) (387,063 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1994, p. 70
A simple rectangular wire loop antenna for 10-meters fed directly with coax.

· A Home-Brew LOOP Tuning Capacitor (members-only) (1,370,421 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1994, pp. 30-32
Another loop for 20- through 10-meters using a novel "trombone slide" arrangement as a tuning capacitor.

· An In-Room, 80-Meter Transmitting Multiturn Loop Antenna (members-only) (50,347 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1996, pp. 43-45. Feedback QST May 1996, p. 48.
A little wood, some wire and a handful of components can make a directional antenna for indoor use where outdoor antennas are not permitted.

· 40 Meters with a Phased Delta Loop (members-only) (194,403 bytes, PDF file)
QST May 1984, pp. 20-21
A bidirectional,40 meter 2-element Delta Loop array made from wire and coax provides a better way to snare some DX at modest cost.

· The Loop Skywire (members-only) (801,637 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1985, pp. 20-22
An inexpensive, easy to build full wave wire loop for 80- or 40-meters.

· A "One-Masted Sloop" for 40, 20, 15 and 10 Meters (members-only) (475,487 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 2002, pp. 44-46
A sloping loop that takes up less space and still performs.

· A Balanced, Everyday Approach to All-Band Bliss (members-only) (238,675 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 2002, pp. 47-50
A noise free loop antenna system

HF Mobile Antennas:

· A Deluxe RV 5-Band Antenna (members-only) (1,220,919 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST October 1980, pp. 38-40
Mount a fold over Hustler 4BTV on your RV for some serious 5 band HF mobiling.

· Another Look at an Old Subject: The Bug Catcher (members-only) (1,010,133 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST December 1980, pp. 30-32
A build it yourself 80- though 10-meter loaded vertical.

· A $20 HF Mobile Antenna (109,255 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 2000, pp. 33-35
A few hours of fun with PVC and wire and you’ve got yourself a respectable mobile antenna for 20- through 6-meters.

· The Alpha Special (members-only) (1,375,115 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST July 1969, pp. 26-29
(Although this multiband horizontal antenna was designed for a 1960’s full size station wagon and not practical for a 21st century wagon, it should work well and look pleasing on mini-van. - Ed.)

· Antennas for Travel Trailers and Campers (members-only) (1,576,179 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1969, pp. 34-38
Some antenna mounting solutions for recreational vehicles.

HF Mobile Longhorn:

HF Quad Antennas:

· A Light and Sturdy Quad for 10 and 15 Meters (1,555,418 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1991, pp.30-32
Here’s how you can build a two-element, lightweight 10- and 15-meter quad using parts available at local hardware and radio-parts stores and a sporting-goods mail-order supplier.

· A Five-Band, Two-Element Quad for 20 through 10 Meters (members-only) (1,280,622 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST April 1992, pp. 52-56
Want a small antenna that covers <STRONGALLthe ham bands between 14 and 29.7 MHz? Here's a solution with two alternatives for construction: using hardware-store parts or modifying an existing commercial triband quad.

· A Two-Element 15-Meter Quad for the Novice (members-only) (299,592 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST March 1970, pp. 31-32

· A Cubical Quad for 20 Meters (members-only) (1,138,968 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST January 1955, pp. 21-22, 122
Reviving a neglected type of beam.

· The Multielement Quad (members-only) (1,355,374 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST May 1963, pp. 11-16
Analysis and construction of a four element 20-meter quad beam

· Update on the Pfeiffer Quad System (members-only) (734,603 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 2001, pp. 59-61
The latest design from K1KL of his miniature 40-meter quad.
Feedback: Oct 2001, p.49 (included in article)

HF Sloper Antennas:

· The 160-Meter Sloper System at K3LR (members-only) (333,186 bytes, PDF file)
QST August 1994, pp. 36-38
A quick review of the theoretical design, the construction, testing and operation of a 160-meter sloper on a 190 foot tower.

· A Reduced-Size Half Sloper For 160 Meters (members-only) (125,931 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1998, pp. 54-56
Here's a limited-space antenna that you can put on your 40 foot tower or even a tree.

· A Two-Band Half-Sloper Antenna (members-only) (787,441 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1980, pp. 32-35
A trapped 40- and 80-meter sloper for your 40 foot tower.

HF Trap Antennas:

· Coaxial cable Antenna Traps (members-only) (1,318,022 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1981, pp. 15-17
Both the coil and capacitor of a parallel-resonant antenna trap can be made from the same length of coaxial cable. Sound intriguing? Here’s how.

· Build a Space-Efficient dipole Antenna for 40, 80, and 160 Meters (570,975 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1992, pp. 35-36
A new trap design, using only RG-58 and PVC pipe, yields better space efficiency than conventional coaxial traps.

· Two New Multiband Trap Dipoles (members-only) (785,934 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST August 1994, pp. 26-29
W8NX details a new coax trap design used in two multiband antennas; one covering 80, 40, 20, 15, and 10 meters, and the other covering 80, 40, 17, and 12 meters.

· An Improved Multiband Trap Dipole Antenna (members-only) (156,121 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 1996, pp. 32-34
You need this - traps with lower loss, higher Q, increased power-handling capability and four-band coverage. Also build a multiband dipole for 80-, 40-, 17-, and 10-meters only 84 feet long.

· Taming the Trap Dipole (members-only) ( 151,344 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 2002, pp. 28-30
A trapped dipole for 10/15/17 meters

HF Vertical Antennas:

· Shunt-Fed Towers: Some Practical Aspects (members-only) (1,384,327 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1982, pp. 21-23
The mechanical basics of using a tower as a vertical antenna raise many questions. This article illustrates and describes some of the simple methods amateurs use.

· A Ground-Coupled Portable Antenna (members-only) (394,517 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 2001, pp. 28-32
A 10 foot vertical antenna that works from 40- to 6 meters.

· Some Plain Facts about Multiband Vertical Antennas
QST September 1972, pp. 14-16, 28
During discussions with newcomers, and old timers for that matter, it becomes apparent that there is considerable confusion as to what exactly a multiband vertical antenna is.

· The Ground-Image Vertical Antenna (3,071,625 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1971, pp. 16-19, 22
Theoretical considerations and experimental results on a vertical antennas.

· Build This Novice Four-Band Vertical (1,568,118 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1978, pp. 16-18
An 80-, 40-, 15- and 10-meter vertical

· A Four-band "Tree" Vertical (members-only) (26,580 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 1995, pp. 69-70
If the thought of a high-visibility HF antenna leaves you cold, it's time to branch out and get to the root of the problem...

· A Low-Profile 10-Meter Antenna (members-only) (682,827 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 1995, p.65
Put this simple whip antenna on your roof and have fun!

· A Modest 45-Foot DX Vertical for 160, 80, 40, and 30 Meters (members-only) (1,646,318 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 1981, pp. 27-31. Feedback QST November 1981, p. 50

· The Offset Multiband Trapless Antenna (OMTA) (188,982 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 1995, pp. 30-32.
Feedback QST December 1995, p. 79
Simple, easy to build, low cost, compact, multiband ... interested?

· Designing a Vertical Antenna (members-only) (924,005 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 1978, pp. 19-21
Graphs cut through the mathematical headaches of antenna design.

· Efficient Ground System for Vertical Antennas (members-only) (1,348,053 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1983, pp. 20-25
Elevated ground systems for vertical antennas have been a bit of a mystery for the past 60 years. This report of an extensive study reveals some startling results.

· A Two-Element Vertical Parasitic Array for 75 Meters (members-only) (292,771 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST December 1995, pp. 38-40
What do a city lot, $50, about half the wire in a dipole, old coax and 6 db of gain have in common?

· Build a Lightweight 20-Meter Vertical (members-only) (310,692 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST December 1995, pp. 64-67
Could this be the lightest HF vertical in the world?

· Simple 5/8-Wave Vertical for 12 and 17 Meters (members-only) (228,750 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 1989, pp. 19-20
Here's how to turn a 30-meter quarter-wave vertical into a 5/8-wave radiator for the 12-meter band. And there’s a bonus: you can use the same approach to use your quarter-wave 40-meter vertical as a 5/8-wave antenna on 17 meters!

· An Efficient Multiband Vertical for 160 through 20 Meters (members-only) (241,737 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1998, pp. 45-49

· A Disguised Flagpole Antenna (members-only) 730,189 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1993, p. 65

· The Flagpole Deluxe (members-only) (2,394,199 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 1978, pp. 29-32
If you've got to hide your antenna, make this flagpole do double duty as an efficient four-band vertical.

· Four Bands on a Pole (members-only) (1,382,518 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 1972, pp. 26-28
A 40-, 20-, 15-, 10-meter trapped vertical made from TV mast.

· A Simple and Portable HF Vertical Travel Antenna (members-only) (395,832 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 2002, pp. 28-31
How to build a portable, efficient 40 through 10-meter vertical antenna on the cheap.
Feedback: QST August 2002, p. 58 (included in PDF file above)

Other HF Antennas:

· Curtains for You (members-only) (1,969,773 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 1991, pp. 26-30. Feedback, QST December 1991, p.73
If you have the real estate and the trees, construct this classic Sterba wire curtain for real gain on 10 meters

· The 160-Meter Antenna Dilemma (members-only) (712,399 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1990, pp. 30-32
A tutorial on what is needed to produce a decent signal on 160-meters.

· Broadband Transmitting Wire Antennas for 160 through 10 Meters (members-only) (243,434 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1995, pp.22-24
A traveling-wave antenna offers some attractive qualities for your station: 50 ohm feedpoint at ground level, no tuner required, horizontal and vertical radiation components, no radials, nothing in the air but wire, and flexible size and height requirements.

· The BRD Zapper: A Quick, Cheap and Easy "ZL Special" Antenna (members-only) (165,194 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1990, pp. 28-29
A 15-meter wire antenna that could be used indoors.

· The Scotsman’s Delight (members-only) (929,160 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1963, pp. 24-26
10-, 15-, or 20-meter two element wire beam.

· The Real "ZL Special" (members-only) (383,476 bytes, PDF file)
ARRL Antenna Book, Ninth Edition, p. 214
10-, 15-, or 20-meter two element unidirectional wire antenna.

· The "Lowbander's" One-Antenna Farm (members-only) (586,355 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1982, pp. 23-24
Not enough area for a full-size 160-meter antenna? You may have more room, electrically, than you realize - with plenty of space for 80- and 40-meter antennas, too.

· The NRY: Simple, Effective Wire Antenna for 80 through 10 Meters (members-only) (1,089,807 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1993, pp.22-24
Known as a broadside collinear curtain array, this antenna is simple to build, rakes in DX signals and has gain over a dipole on all the bands it covers!

· Zip-Cord Antennas - Do They Work? (members-only) (169,873 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1979, pp. 31-32
Parallel power cord is readily available and is easy to work with. How efficient is it when used at radio frequencies? Well, that depends.

· The "Double-Bazooka" Antenna (members-only) (834,376 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1968, pp. 38-39
Broad-band dipole using coaxial construction.

· The Off-Center-Fed Long-Wire (members-only)
W1FB's Antenna Notebook, 1987, pp. 36-38
This is a simple wire multiband antenna that can be fed with either coax or ladder-line and can be made to operate well from 160- to 10-meters with an antenna tuner.

· A 40-Meter DDRR Antenna (members-only) (1,556,173 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1971, pp. 28-32
The DDRR will provide communications of respectable quality where it is impossible, because of inadequate space, to erect a 40-meter dipole.

· Study of the DDRR Antenna (members-only) (599,394 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1972, pp. 27-31, 36
The theory behind the DDRR.

· The NVIS--A Low Antenna for Regional Communications (members-only) (288,967 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 2002, pp. 28-30
A low-to-the-ground wire loop antenna that can provide good regional coverage, day or night.

· The N4GG Array (members-only) (537,493 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 2002, pp. 35-39
A simple, nearly invisible, multiband wire antenna with reasonable gain, low angle of radiation.

VHF/UHF Yagi/Beam Antennas:

· Homebrewing a 6-Meter Yagi (members-only) (from QEX RF column) Members Only
QEX January/February 1998, p. 52-57
In typical Zack Lau, W1VT fashion, the element and mounting clamps are machined, but good ol’ hose clamps and hardware store mast mountings will work on this 4-element antenna.

· Small 70-cm Yagi (members-only) (671,292 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QEX July/August 2001. pp. 55-59
A 6-elements designed for a wide bandwidth.

· 2x3=6 (members-only) (84,913 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 2000, pp. 34-36
Two three-element 6-meter Yagi designs.

· 7dB for 7 Bucks (844,127 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1993, pp. 54-55
An inexpensive 3 element 2-meter Yagi made from PVC and welding rod.

· A Five-Element, 2-Meter Yagi for $20 (457,324 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1999, pp. 34-37
Get about 10dB from a modified Radio Shack FM broadcast receiving antenna.

· Circular Polarization and OSCAR Communications (members-only) (1,401,889 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1980, pp. 11-15
OSCAR users are switching to circular polarization to lessen signal fading. Build this low-cost antenna system and hear what you've been missing.

· A Tri-Yagi for 50 MHz (members-only) (862,492 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 1980, pp. 14-15
For the performance of a 6-element wide-spaced beam on a boom half its normal length, try this “trigonal” reflector scheme.

· An LPDA for 2 Meters Plus (members-only) (839,246 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 2001, pp. 42-46
This Log-Periodic Dipole Array (beam) antenna covers 130-170 MHz for those who also like monitoring.

VHF/UHF J Pole Antennas

· A True Plumber's Delight for 2-Meters - An All-Copper J-Pole (1,397,341 bytes, PDF file)
ARRL Antenna Compendium Volume 4, pp. 195- 197

· An Easy Dual-Band VHF/UHF Antenna (658,950 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1994, pp. 61-62
A J-Pole for 2-meters and 70-cm.
Feedback QST February 1995, p. 56. (indluded in PDF file above)

· A VHF-UHF 3-Band Mobile Antenna (members-only) (519,070 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1980, pp. 16-17
Three bands - 144, 220 and 440 - on one stick, a triband J-pole.

· A 146- and 445-MHz J-Pole Antenna (members-only) (207,485 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 2000, pp. 50-53
The total materials cost is about $21, and only common hand tools are required.

VHF/UHF Mobile Antennas:

· A VHF-UHF 3-Band Mobile Antenna (members-only) (519,070 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1980, pp. 16-17
Three bands - 144, 220 and 440 - on one stick, a triband J-pole.

· A Glass-Mounted 2-Meter Mobile Antenna (members-only) (1,893,473 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 1991, pp. 31-34.
Technical Correspondence QST September 1991, pp. 41-42
Want a no-holes, no-paint-scratching antenna? This easy-to-build glass-mount mobile antenna is the answer!

· An Easy, On-Glass Antenna with Multiband Capability (members-only) (312,538 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 1993, pp. 35-37
A homebrew on-glass dual antenna system for 2-meters and 222 or 440, etc.

· Bicycle-Mobile Antennas (1,042,765 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1993, pp. 52-53
Mounting an antenna for your HT on your bicycle.

· Glass Mounted Antennas (members-only) Members Only
What the antenna manufacturers have to say.

· A Simple Halo for 2-Meter Use (members-only) (132,963 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST August 1957, p.29
Making a car-radio whip serve as a single-wire transmission line

· A Two-Band Halo for V.H.F. Mobile (members-only) (1,438,612 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 1958, pp. 11-12, 140, 142
50 and 144 MHz with a single mobile antenna system

VHF/UHF Vertical Antennas:

· Construct a Simple 5/8-Wavelength Vertical Antenna for 2 Meters (444,192 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1980, pp. 22-23
No loading coils - inexpensive - easy to build.

· A 2-Meter Phased-Array (members-only) (113,921 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 1998, pp. 61-63
Made from two "SO-239" ground planes and some PVC tubing.

VHF/UHF Quad Antennas:

· A Portable Quad for 2 Meters (1,185,310 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1980, pp. 26-28
Backpacking, boating or mountaintopping? Invest an afternoon's work and pack this novel directional gain antenna on your next expedition.

· An Interlaced Quad Array for 50 and 144 Mc. (members-only) (1,944,699 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1963, pp. 11-14, 152
A VHF adaptation of a popular HF beam design

· 6-Meter Quad-Turnstile (members-only) (589,006 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 2002, pp. 42-46
A omni directional, horizontally polarizes 6-meter loop antenna

VHF/UHF “Other” Antennas:

70-Centimeter:

· The Long-Boom Quagi (members-only) (1,191,496 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1978, pp. 20-21
Build a 15-element Quagi antenna for 432MHz.
Including "Additional Bands for the Quagi"
QST April 1978, Technical Correspondence, p. 34
(Also see "Building Quagi Antennas", ARRL Antenna Book 18th Edition, pp. 18-33 to 18-35)

2-Meter:

· Build a Portable Groundplane Antenna (756,102 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1991, pp. 33-34
A suitable connector and some wire makes this nifty ground plane for your HT.

· Recycle Those Rabbit Ears (members-only) (135,218 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1995, pp. 72-73
Make a 2-meter dipole from trashed TV rabbit Ears

· Recycling TV Antennas for 2-Meter Use (610,754 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1996, pp. 34-36
Make a 2-meter beam from junked TV antennas.

· Make Your Own "Rubber Duckies" (63,311 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1998, pp. 37-38
Make your own 2-meter rubber duckies that will perform better than many commercial units.

· A Simple Fixed Antenna for VHF/UHF Satellite Work (members-only) (501,974 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST August 2001, pp. 38-41
Work the low-earth orbiting satellites with this effective Turnstile Antenna system

· A Simple Halo for 2-Meter Use (members-only) (132,963 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST August 1957, p.29
Making a car-radio whip serve as a single-wire transmission line

6-Meter:

· The Simple Sixer (members-only) (265,805 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 1999, pp. 56-57
A 6-meter rotatable dipole

· Wire Gain Antennas for 6 Meters (members-only) (35,068 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1997, pp. 66-67
Several wire antennas from the Long-Wire all the way to the Sterba Curtain for some gain on 6-meters.

· Let's Make the "Hentenna" (members-only) (192,788 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1982, pp. 16-17
An “interesting” VHF antenna made from sticks and wire.

· Six Meters from Your Easy Chair (members-only) ( 118,988 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 2002, pp. 33-34
A 6-meter squalo made from an old lawn chair

· A Two-Band Halo for V.H.F. Mobile (members-only) (1,438,612 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 1958, pp. 11-12, 140, 142
50 and 144 MHz with a single mobile antenna system

· 6-Meter Quad-Turnstile (members-only) (589,006 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 2002, pp. 42-46
A omni directional, horizontally polarizes 6-meter loop antenna

Antenna Gain:

· Antenna Gain Measurement -- Part 1 (members-only) (1,012,708bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 1982, pp. 35-37
Technique -- the fine points of making accurate gain measurments withut access to a professional antenna range.

· Antenna Gain Measurement -- Part 2 (members-only) (1,371,250 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST December 1982, pp. 27-31
Instrumentation -- simple, easily constructed instruments permit a precise determination of antenna gain.

Antenna Ground:

·       The Effects of Real Ground on Antennas -- Part 1 (members-only) (910,684 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1984, pp. 15-18
You've seen free-space antenna patterns, and even pattern calculations that include the effect of a theoretical, perfect ground. But what is your antenna really doing?
Feedback (QST March 1984): (25,487 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
Parts of Fig. 3 in this article appear with wrong captions. The plot over caption I belongs with caption K; plot K should be with caption L and plot L with caption I.

·       The Effects of Real Ground on Antennas -- Part 2 (members-only) (700,360 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 1984, pp. 34-36

·       The Effects of Real Ground on Antennas -- Part 3 (members-only) (1,193,714 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 1984, pp. 30-35

·       The Effects of Real Ground on Antennas -- Part 4 (members-only) (2,036,295 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST August 1984, pp. 31-35

·       The Effects of Real Ground on Antennas -- Part 5 (members-only) (2,284,710 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 1984, pp. 35-39

·       Verticals, Ground Systems and Some History (members-only) (330,007 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 2000, pp. 38-44
The answers on what makes a vertical antenna work.

 

Antenna Modeling:

·       A Beginner's Guide to Modeling with NEC, Part 1 (members-only) (199,355 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 2000, pp. 34-38
Feedback: Notes 1. NEC4WIN from Orion URL should be http://www.orionmicro.com

·       A Beginner's Guide to Modeling with NEC, Part 2 (members-only) (350,565 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST December 2000, pp. 40-44

·       A Beginner's Guide to Modeling with NEC, Part 3 (members-only) (135,278 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 2001, pp. 44-48

·       A Beginner's Guide to Modeling with NEC, Part 4 (members-only) (121,570 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 2001, pp. 31-35

·       MININEC: The Other Edge of the Sword (908,702 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1991, pp. 18-22
MININEC software is powerful, but you need to know its limitations.

·       EZNEC 3.0 for Windows (members-only) (77,802 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 2000, p. 66
A quick review of this software

·       QUICKLOOP A Loop-Array Modeling Aid (members-only) (77,315 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 2001, pp. 73-74 (Hints and Kinks)
Using EZNEC to model a 2-meter loop

·       A Beginner's Guide to Transmission-Line and Antenna-Tuner Modeling (members-only) 99,172 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 2001, pp. 34-37
Using the new TLW software bundled with the 19th edition of The ARRL Antenna Book

 

Balloon  Antennas:

· A Skyhook for the '90s (members-only) (286,279 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1997, pp. 31-33
A technique for using large advertising balloons to hold up your Field Day antenna.

· Balloon Skyhooks (members-only) (7,942 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST August 1997, p. 69
Technical Correspondence comments on the above article.

Grounding:

· Grounding Q&A

· Lab Notes - Different Grounds for Different Shacks (425,984 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1996, pp. 80-81

· Antennas and Grounds for Apartments (491,520 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1980, pp. 40-43
What do you do when the landlord says "no antenna"?

· Assorted Hints & Kinks

How Antennas Work

· Why an Antenna Radiates
QST November 1992, pp. 59-63
You don't have to know how an antenna works to use one, but getting a handle on this subject can deepen your understanding of radio. Here's a searching look at the mysterious process by which our antennas hurl energy from Here to There.

· Which HAM Radio Antenna is the Best Choice for Point to Point Communications
by 10th grader Heather Cox (KB8VYQ)
Received award at the 42nd Annual Southeastern Michigan Science Fair 2000

· An Analysis of the Balun (1,835,322 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1980, pp. 19-21
What does a balun do for you? What happens if you don't use one? Does a balun really make a difference?

· The Effect of Continuous, Conductive Guy Wires on Antenna Performance (members-only) (814,978 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST August 1993, 22-24
Radio amateurs have long worked to preserve antenna patterns by installing segmented, nonresonant guys. Now, computer modeling reveals that unbroken guys can work just about as well.

· "My Feed Line Tunes My Antenna!" (members-only) (341,217 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 1991, pp. 33-35
A tutorial - Everything you should know about feed-lines.

· Match Bandwidth of Resonant Antenna Systems (members-only) (589,979 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1991, pp. 21-25
Did you know that deliberately mismatching an antenna to it's feed line can increase its SWR bandwidth? Here's how it works.

· Coaxial Cable -- The Neglected Link (826,822 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1981, pp. 28-31
Is a better grade of coaxial cable worth the price difference? This analysis of the importance of shielding in coax lines explains why the answer is "Yes!"

· Combined Vertical Directivity (members-only) (506,839 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1981, pp. 19-21
You need a low radiation angle for DX and a high angle for short skip. Most of us shoot for maximum antenna height and hope for good results. Learn how to calculate the vertical radiation patterns for various heights.

· Vertical Array Analysis (members-only) (356,399 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1981, pp. 22-25
You can determine the radiation pattern of an experimental phased array before building it. A computer helps, but you can get the same results with a ruler and protractor.

· Antenna Ads in ARRL Publications (members-only) (55,578 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 1998, pp. 54-56
After more than 35 years, antenna manufacturers may once again advertise performance figures in League publications. Why has this changed and what should the astute amateur consumer be looking for in an antenna ad (or product brochure)?

· An Examination of the Gamma Match (members-only) (904,644 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 1969, pp. 11-15, 57
An in-depth theoretical discussion of the gamma match.

· Far-Field Fallacy (members-only) Members Only
QEX December 1987, pp. 10-11
Put simply, the performance of a DX antenna needs to be measured under DX conditions.

Limited Space/Indoor Antennas:

· Welcome to Rentsville, DX (86,763 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 1998, pp. 66-67
Living in a high-rise apartment can be an advantage rather than a hindrance. Here are a few things to have in mind even before you start.

· The Care and Feeding of a Condo Antenna Farm (members-only) (136,694 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 2001, pp. 64-66
Some tips on stealth and diplomacy that may help you enjoy ham radio from your condo.
Additional images

· HF Antennas for Restricted Space
Some hints on hiding an antenna

· Lab Notes - Limited Space Antennas (327,680 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1992, pp. 85-86
Some hints on putting up antennas in tight spaces.

· Antennas and Grounds for Apartments (491,520 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1980, pp. 40-43
What do you do when the landlord says "no antenna"?

· Better Results with Indoor Antennas (397,267 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 1979, pp. 18-21
Rules for a successful indoor antenna.

· Compact and Portable Antenna Roundup (members-only) (681,327 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST March 1998, pp. 72-78 (Product Review)
This review covers five commercial HF limited space antennas.

· An In-Room, 80-Meter Transmitting Multiturn Loop Antenna (members-only) (50,347 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1996, pp. 43-45. Feedback QST May 1996, p. 48.
A little wood, some wire and a handful of components can make a directional antenna for indoor use where outdoor antennas are not permitted.

· A Disguised Flagpole Antenna (729,761 bytes, PDF file)
QST May 1993, p. 65

· The Flagpole Deluxe (2,394,199 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1978, pp. 29-32
If you've got to hide your antenna, make this flagpole do double duty as an efficient four-band vertical.

· A Five-Element, 2-Meter Yagi for $20 (members-only) (457,324 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 1999, pp. 34-37
Get about 10dB from a modified Radio Shack FM broadcast receiving antenna.

· A 40-Meter DDRR Antenna (members-only) (1,556,173 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST December 1971, pp. 28-32 Basically this antenna consists of a ¼-wave element grounded at one end and wound into a single turn coil, a few conductor diameters above ground.

· A Bite Size Beam (members-only) (1,678,850 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 1973, pp. 11-14
Use loading coils to shrink the size of a 20-, 15-meter beam.

· The HW-40 Micro Beam (members-only) (961,772 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1974, pp. 25-27,31
A two element 40-meter beam with helically wound elements.

· Antenna Aesthetics (15,663 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 2001, p. 97
Think of your neighbors when planning your antenna farm.

· Apartment Dwellers' Slinky Jr. Antenna (members-only) (412,264 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1974 QST, pp, 22-23
And old design for a shortened dipole made from a child’s toy that is still popular today

· Flagpole J for 10 Meters (members-only) (1,221,615 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 1989
Hide your antenna in plane sight.

Receive wire/Beverage Antennas

· The Classic Beverage Antenna, Revisited (members-only) (1,350,572 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 1982, pp. 11-17
An update on an historical 1922 QST article describing the “definitive” receiving antenna.

· The Wave Antenna For 200 Meter Reception (members-only) (3,061,381 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 1922, pp. 7-15
The original article by Mr. Beverage that started a legend.

Smith Charts:

· Smith-Chart Calculations for the Radio Amateur - Part 1 (members-only) (557,056 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 1966, pp. 22-26
Graphical Solutions of Transmission-Line Problems

· Smith-Chart Calculations for the Radio Amateur - Part 2 (members-only) (393,216 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1966, pp. 30-33
Graphical Solutions of Transmission-Line Problems

· Another Look at Reflections (members-only) (1,114,112 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
Everything you wanted to know about SWR … and then some.

Transmission Lines and SWR

·       Using 1/2-Inch 75-Ohm CATV Hardline (members-only) (48,839 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   QST January 2000, p. 91 (World Above 50 MHz)
   Consider using Hardline when planning a VHF/UHF repeater or even a home station.

·       Don't Solder to Connector Adapters!
   QST December 1995, p.76 (Hints and Hinks)
   A warning about the installation of PL-259s to smaller coax cable.

·       "My Feed Line Tunes My Antenna!" (members-only) (282,589 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   QST November 1991, pp. 33-35
   A discussion on how the feed line can change the resonant frequency of the antenna.

·       The Whys of Transmission Lines Part 1 (members-only) (342,192 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   QST January 1965, pp. 25-28
   A beginner’s guide to transmission lines.

·       The Whys of Transmission Lines Part 2 (members-only) (217,959 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   QST February 1965, pp. 24-26
   Standing-wave ratio and line losses

·       The Whys of Transmission Lines Part 3 (members-only) (281,058 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   QST March 1965, pp. 19-22
   Putting the antenna and line together

·       Another Look at Reflections (members-only) (1,114,112 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   Everything you wanted to know about SWR … and then some.

·       The SWR Obsession (458,752 bytes, PDF file)
   QST, April 1994, pp. 70-72, 74
   What is your SWR meter really saying?

·       The Lure of the Ladder Line (883,079 bytes, PDF file)
   QST December 1993, pp. 70-71
   Discussion of some advantages to using ladder-line in place of coax to feed multiband dipoles.

·       Proving the Conjugate Matching Power Theorem (members-only) Members Only
   QEX July 2000, pp. 55-58

·       Let's Talk Transmission Lines (37,970 bytes, PDF file)
   QST June 1997, pp. 57-59
   Coax or ladder-line? Which dielectric? How do I reduce losses?

·       Opening Lines: A Short History of Coaxial Cable (members-only) (80,232 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   QST August 2001, pp. 62-64
   Nothing technical, just why coax is.

Tuners/Transmatch:

· Do You Need an Antenna Tuner? (815,428 bytes, PDF file)
QST January 1994, pp. 70-72
Maybe yes, maybe no. It all depends on the type of antenna and feed line you're using.

· Antenna Tuners: Are They Necessary? (members-only) Members Only
QST August 1989, pp. 43-44
A complement to the previous article

· A Transmatch for Balanced or Unbalanced lines (members-only) (542,588 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1995, pp. 22.65-22.66
A construction project.

· A Balanced Balanced Antenna Tuner (members-only) (1,689,343 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1990, pp. 28-32
Build the right antenna tuner to use with your balanced, open-wire-feed antenna.

· An Automatic Antenna Tuner: the AT-11 (members-only) (1,657,492 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 1996, pp. 35-39
This easy-to-build, fully automatic tuner.

· Getting the Most Out of Your T-Network Antenna Tuner (members-only) (416,200 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 1995, pp. 44-47
Here's how to adjust this popular tuning circuit so it transfers maximum power to your antenna.

· How to Evaluate Your Antenna Tuner - Part 1 (members-only) (2,634,135 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 1995, pp. 30-34
With some simple low-power measurements you can learn a lot about your antenna tuner. There may be some real surprises.

· How to Evaluate Your Antenna Tuner - Part 2 (members-only) (3,818,635 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1995, pp. 33-37
AI1H shows data taken using a low-power SWR tester and his simple load boxes to evaluate several antenna tuners.

· The EZ-Tuner Part 1 (members-only) (379,231 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 2002, pp. 40-43
This could be one of the most versatile homebrew antenna tuners ever created.

· The EZ-Tuner Part 2 (members-only) (427,544 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 2002, pp. 28-34

· The EZ-Tuner Part 3 (members-only) (184,215 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 2002, pp. 33-36

· For information on a different but related subject, see Transmission Lines/SWR

Antique Radio

· Flea Market Madness! A Beginner's Guide to Buying and Selling
QST August 1998. pp. 57-59
What to look for, and look out for, at one of the best sources for bargains and treasures.

· Bring 'Em Back Alive! (members-only) (720,896 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST August 1995, pp. 49-52
Restoring vintage ham gear is challenging and fun, but be sure you take proper safety precautions.
Feedback: QST October 1995, p. 78

· How to Buy Military Surplus (members-only) (65,536 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1996, pp. 63-65
Have you checked out the goodies at your nearest military base? Why not? You paid for them!

· Refurbishing "Boat-Anchors" (members-only) (262,144 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 1997, pp. 35-38
Bring vintage radios back to life.

· Lab Notes - Electronic Troubleshooting (members-only) (32,768 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 1995, pg. 87-88
Tips on repairing old equipment

· Lab Notes - How to Locate Manuals and Documentation (members-only) (425,984 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 1992, pp. 67-69

· How to Test and Align a Linear Amplifier (members-only) (1,617,794 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1952, pp. 39-43, 128
Alignment procedure for an old tube type SSB amplifier.

Amateur Television – Fast Scan

· An Introduction to Amateur Television - Part 1 (2,555,904 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1993, pp. 19-23

· An Introduction to Amateur Television - Part 2 (1,114,112 bytes, PDF file)
QST May 1993, pp. 43-47
The basic ATV Station

· An Introduction to Amateur Television - Part 3 (2,129,920 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1993, pp. 35-41

Amateur Television – Slow Scan

· FAX480 and SSTV Interfaces and Software (members-only) (1,856,609 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 1998, pp. 32-36
With free software and about $15 in parts you can operate FAX and SSTV.

· TV on 10 (members-only) (131,963 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 2001, pp. 68-71
Swap pictures on 10 meters around the world.

· Slow-Scan TV - It Isn't Expensive Anymore! (3,502,931 bytes, PDF file)
QST Jan 1993, pp. 20-30
Ham stations equipped with an IBM PC-compatible computer now have another use for it - SSTV!
(A hardware solution)

· Getting Started with Slow Scan Television (360,448 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1997, pp. 53-56
Who says hams should be heard and not seen?
(A software solution)

Automatic Link Enable:

· A Federal Standard for HF Radio Automatic Link Establishment (445,577 bytes, PDF file)
QEX January 1990, p. 3

· Growing Family of Federal Standards for HF Radio Automatic Link Establishment (ALE) - Part I (552,411 bytes, PDF file)
QEX July 1993, pp. 3-8

· The Growing Family of Federal Standards for HF Radio Automatic Link Establishment (ALE) - Part II (2,214,846 bytes, PDF file)
QEX August 1993, pp. 9-14

· The Growing Family of Federal Standards for HF Radio Automatic Link Establishment (ALE) - Part III (548,965 bytes, PDF file)
QEX September 1993, pp. 14-19

· The Growing Family of Federal Standards for HF Radio Automatic Link Establishment (ALE) - Part IV (572,180 bytes, PDF file)
QEX October 1993, pp. 13-18

· The Growing Family of Federal Standards for HF Radio Automatic Link Establishment (ALE) - Part V (2,463,220 bytes, PDF file)
QEX November 1993, pp. 9-12

· The Growing Family of Federal Standards for HF Radio Automatic Link Establishment (ALE) - Part VI (252,549 bytes, PDF file)
QEX December 1993, pp. 7-12

· ALE--The Coming of Automatic Link Establishment (13,952 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1995, p. 68 (Technical Correspondence)

Batteries:

· Which Battery Should You Use in Your Equipment? (65,536 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1999, p. 40-42
NiCd, NiMH, Alkaline, etc ... How do they differ from one another, and which is best for your application?

· Nickel-Metal-Hydride Batteries in Amateur Radio Applications (members-only) (262,144 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 1994, pp. 38-39
Meet the newest power source for portable equipment: the NiMH battery

· A NiCd Never Forgets. Or Does It? (622,592 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1994, pp. 70-71
A discussion of memory effect.

· A Smart Charger For Nickel-Cadmium Batteries (members-only) (262,144 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 1994, pp. 40-42
Recharge your Hand-held's battery pack FAST, with this easy weekend project

· The Ubiquitous, Notorious NiCd (members-only) (131,072 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 1995, p. 74
Technical Correspondence - NiCd battery memory effect

· Testing Rechargeable Alkaline Batteries - and More (members-only) (759,666 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX April 1996, pp. 3-12
The ARRL Lab investigates those rechargeable Alkaline batteries.

· A Battery-Voltage Indicator (members-only) (73,203 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1998, pp. 50-51
Here's a quick and inexpensive project that allows you to keep tabs on your battery's condition.

· Honey, They've Shrunk the Batteries! (members-only) (569,703 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST December 2001, pp. 31-35
A rundown on today’s popular batteries, their uses, characteristics and care.

Buying a Rig

· Flea Market Madness! A Beginner's Guide to Buying and Selling
QST August 1998. pp. 57-59
What to look for, and look out for, at one of the best sources for bargains and treasures.

· Lab Notes - What Rig Should I Buy? (360,448 bytes, PDF file)
QST Feb 1993, pp. 79-80

· Be A Bone Yard Ph.D. (1,802,240 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1994, pp. 64-67
The educational approach to buying your first HF rig.

· QST Product Reviews: A Look Behind The Scenes (917,504 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 1994, pp. 35-38
Learn how the ARRL Laboratory evaluates new products - and what all those numbers mean to you!

· "9600-Ready" Radios: Ready or Not? (members-only) (147,562 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1995, pp. 24-29
What the ARRL Lab says you should know before buying a VHF/UHF FM transceiver with 9600 baud capability.

· The DX Prowess of HF Receivers (143,524 bytes, PDF file)
QEX Sept/Oct 2002, pp. 36-40
Performance numbers for a variety of modern day receivers

Beginner – First Steps In Radio Series:

· Part 1 - Getting into Amateur Radio Electronics (1,120,009 bytes, PDF file)
QST January 1984, pp. 22-25

· Part 2 - How to Read a Schematic Diagram (1,718,096 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1984, pp. 19-22

· Part 3 - Understanding Resistors (2,625,470 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1984, pp. 11-15
Feedback: QST August 1984, p. 49. The output waveform in Fig. 5B should be shown 180deg out of phase with the input signal.

· Part 4 - Getting to Know Capacitors (1,911,149 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1984, pp. 37-40

· Part 5 - An Introduction to Coils and Transformers (2,627,078 bytes, PDF file)
QST May 1984, pp. 15-19

· Part 6 - The World of Switches and Relays (2,080,408 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1984, pp. 25-29

· Part 7 - Meet the Versatile Diode (1,670,215 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1984, pp. 30-33

· Part 8 -- The Magic of Transistors (1,604,440 bytes, PDF file)
QST August 1984, pp. 38-41

· Part 9 -- Radio Antennas and How They Operate (1,472,192 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1984, pp. 30-34

· Part 10 -- How Receivers Work (1,342,714 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 1984, pp. 30-33

· Part 11 -- The Basics of Transmitters (2,329,419 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1984, pp. 40-44

· Part 12 -- The Amateur and Electrical Safety (838,857 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1984, pp. 19-22

· Part 13 -- Radio Waves and Communications Distance (2,870,599 bytes, PDF file)
QST January 1985, pp. 31-33, 38

· Part 14 -- Understanding TV and Radio Interference (1,828,953 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1985, pp. 34-37

· Part 15 -- Diodes and How They Are Used (2,026,309 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1985, pp. 34-38

· Part 16 -- Resonance and Tuning Methods (2,924,206 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1985, pp. 28-31

· Part 17 -- Understanding FM Transmitters (817,021 bytes, PDF file)
QST May 1985, pp. 23-25

· Part 18 -- Understanding FM Receivers (1,218,817 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1985, pp. 25-27

· Part 19 -- Equipping Your First Ham Station (1,591,894 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1985, pp. 34-36

Beginner – Your First Antenna:

· Wire Antennas for the Beginner (1,781,534 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1983, pp. 33-38
Every ham knows how to make and install wire antennas. But if you've never done it, you probably have a few questions. Here are some answers.

· Ground-plane Antennas for 144, 222, 449 MHz (109,309 bytes, PDF file)
ARRL Antenna Book, 18th Edition, pp. 18-16 to 18.17
(If you can't find aluminum rod or wire or welding rods, try metal coat hangers - they work too.)

· Build a Portable Groundplane Antenna (1,206,418 bytes, PDF File)
QST July 1991, pp. 33-34
Need a better antenna for your hand-held radio? Here's the answer.

· Feeding Your Station (1,743,425 bytes, PDF File)
QST December 1983, pp. 20-23
Fat coaxial line, skinny cable, open-wire feeders or 300-ohm ribbon line - the correct choice can save the beginner a few dollars while helping to ensure maximum performance.
Feedback: QST April 1984, p. 51. There is an error in Table 1. The capacitance of RG-11A/U is 20.5 pF/ft, not 0.5 pF/ft as shown.
Feedback: The first formula in note 1 should read m = ft x 0.3048

· A 15-Meter Beam "On A Budget" (602,286 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1971, pp. 41-43
Even the simplest beam can be expensive due to the cost of aluminum tubing. Here's a solution.

· Choosing An Antenna (406,416 bytes, PDF file)
QST January 1962, pp. 25-29, 140, 142
As the title indicates, this article is written to help the newcomer decide on the kind of antenna to select for his station.

· The Arial Performers of the Radio Circuits Part 1 (999,273 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1978, pp. 42-46
Antennas are as different as the hams who use them.

· The Arial Performers of the Radio Circuits Part 2 (1,876,039 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1978, pp. 44-48
Why do some antennas get out better than others? Here are some practical answers plus all you need to know for building a simple coax-fed, half-wave dipole.

· What Does Your SWR Cost You? (149,201 bytes, PDF file)
QST January 1979, pp. 19-20
Wondering whether to spend a fine day with the YL or with your antenna? This article may help you decide.

· Antenna Accessories for the Beginner (1,786,359 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1979, pp. 15-19
How many antenna gadgets are needed to put out a good signal? Perhaps your station is over-equipped, or maybe you've been shortchanging yourself on accessories.

· Which HAM Radio Antenna is the Best Choice for Point to Point Communications
by 10th grader Heather Cox (KB8VYQ)
Received award at the 42nd Annual Southeastern Michigan Science Fair 2000

Beginner – Using Your Equipment:

· Back to Basics (27,626 bytes, PDF file)
QST August 1995, pp. 67-68
Advice on topics from shopping for your first radio to putting up your first antenna.

· Setting Up Your Station (296,252 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1984, pp.16-19
Some hints and How To for putting together an operating table, getting coax through walls and windows, switching antennas and more.
Feedback: The diameter of the coils used in the "brute-force" line filter is omitted. They may be anywhere from 1 to 1-1/2 inches in diameter.

· Feeding Your Station (1,743,425 bytes, PDF File)
QST December 1983, pp. 20-23
Fat coaxial line, skinny cable, open-wire feeders or 300-ohm ribbon line - the correct choice can save the beginner a few dollars while helping to ensure maximum performance.
Feedback: QST April 1984, p. 51. There is an error in Table 1. The capacitance of RG-11A/U is 20.5 pF/ft, not 0.5 pF/ft as shown.
Feedback: The first formula in note 1 should read m = ft x 0.3048

· Coaxial Cables: Their Construction And Use (204,866 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1984, pp. 19-21
Here is some background information to help us understand coaxial cable and use it more effectively.

· How to Maximize Your Receiver's Effective Selectivity--Part 1 (members-only) (319,036 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 2001, pp. 42-48
Effective use of your receiver's selectivity features can reduce or eliminate much interference and band noise.

· How to Maximize Your Receiver's Effective Selectivity--Part 2 (members-only) (174,452 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 2001, pp. 44-47

· Learning to Use Field-Strength Meters (members-only) (1,103,024 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 1985, pp.26-30
A field-strength meter is essentially a small receiver with an indicating device, such as a sensitive dc meter. This simple instrument is very useful during antenna experiments and adjustments.
Feedback: M1 of Fig. 3 should be a 0-1 mA meter.

· Antenna Tuner Operation
Adapted from questions in The Doctor, QST
Answers the question, "How do I use my antenna tuner?"

· Does Your Solid-State Transceiver Reduce its Power Output Power with Rising SWR Because it's Solid-State? (members-only) Members Only
QST June 1989, pp. 42-43

· Improving and Using R-X Noise Bridges (members-only) (462,466 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST August 1989, pp. 27-32, 52
A noise bridge can be used to measure antenna impedances, coaxial cable losses and characteristic impedances, etc. This article shows how to improve your measurement accuracy.
Feedback: QST January 1990, p. 27

· What Your Frequency Display Really Tells You--Part 1 (1,395,975 bytes, PDF file)
QST August 1991, pp.28-32
How close to the band edge can you operate?
Feedback: QST June 1992, p. 64 (included in article)

· What Your Frequency Display Really Tells You--Part 2 (2,105,365 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1991, pp. 26-31

· Improved Dynamic-Range Testing (members-only) 899,952 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX Jul/Aug 2002, pp. 46-52

· What Can You Do with a Dip Meter? (members-only) 111,113 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 2002, pp.65-68
The dipper is one piece of test equipment that can replace a whole shelf of expensive gear.

Beginner – ARRL “Lab Notes” Series:

· Creating a Technical Library (415,532 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1991, pp. 35-36, 100

· Interference Primer--Part 1 (267,239 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1992, pp. 73-74

· Interference Primer--Part 2 (312,974 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1992, pp. 81-83

· How to Locate Amateur Radio Software (1,097,726 bytes, PDF file)
QST April, 1992, pp. 59-60

· How to Locate Manuals and Documentation (364,753 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1992, pp. 67-69

· Substituting Parts (367,027 bytes, PDF file)
QST August 1992, pp. 66-67

· Interference Primer--Part 3 (1,808,978 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 1992, pp. 67-69

· Limited Space Antennas (252,606 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1992, pp. 85-86

· What Rig Should I Buy? (277,573 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1993, pp. 79-80

· Emergency Power (271,471 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1993, pp. 76-77

· Curing Interference to Non-Radio Equipment (271,315 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1993, pp. 64-65

· Kits Galore! (259,624 bytes, PDF file)
QST August 1993, pp. 70-71

· Printed-Circuit Board Circus (238,660 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 1993, pp. 79-80

· Satellite-Tracking Software (203,256 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1993, pp. 89-90

· TVI, CATVI and VCRI (941,189 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1994, pp. 82-83

· Where Am I? (310,149 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1994, pp. 86-88

· Setting up for Field Day (241,396 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1994, pp. 79-80

· Lightning Protection--Part 1 (157,452 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 1994, pp. 81-82

· Lightning Protection--Part 2 (238,736 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1994, pp. 45-46

· Mobile Installations and Electromagnetic Compatibility (32,768 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1995, pp. 74-75

· Power-Watt's It All About? (64,006 bytes, PDF file)
QST May 1995, pp. 88-89

· FM Antennas (254,616 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1995, pp. 77-78

· Computer Interference
QST September 1995, pp. 97-98

· Electronic Troubleshooting (26,358 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1995, pp. 87-88

· You've Got Questions? Here's How to Find the Answers! (20,141 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1996, pp. 85-86

· Different Grounds for Different Shacks (19,361 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1996, pp. 80-81

· Troubleshooting Electrical Noise (75,342 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1996, pp. 73-74

· Here Comes the Sun! (22,464 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 1996, pp. 74-75

· Multiband Dipoles Compared (26,507 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1996, pp. 73-74

· Capacitor Basics (53,313 bytes, PDF file)
QST January 1997, pp. 85-86

Construction – Building Equipment:

·       A High-Performance Homebrew Transceiver: Part 1 (members-only) (578,391 bytes, PDF file)
   QEX Mar/Apr 1999, pp. 16-24
   Here is a general description of a transceiver built without regard to size or complexity--the only goal is optimum performance for DX and contests.

·       A High-Performance Homebrew Transceiver: Part 2 (members-only) (666,083 bytes, PDF file)
   QEX Sep/Oct 1999, pp. 3-8
   The IF board--IF amp, AGC, noise blanker and RF speech clipper.

·       A High-Performance Homebrew Transceiver: Part 3 (members-only)  (933,045 bytes, PDF file)
   QEX Nov/Dec 1999, pp. 41-50
   Mixing, premixing, dual receiving, IF shift and CW offset.
   Feedback: QEX Jul/Aug 2000, p. 59 (incl above)
   Feedback: QEX Nov/Dec 2000, p. 60 (incl above)

·       A High-Performance Homebrew Transceiver: Part 4 (members-only) (732,439 bytes, PDF file)
   QEX Jan/Feb 2000, pp. 47-56
   The AF board

·       A High-Performance Homebrew Transceiver: Part 5 (members-only) (1,127,327 bytes, PDF file)
   QEX Mar/Apr 2000

·       A Broadband HF Amplifier Using Low-Cost Power MOSFETs--Part 1 (members-only) (289,425 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   QST March 1999, pp. 40-43
   So you finished building your K-2 or K-1. Now what? One watt will get you 40 with this 160- to 10-meter amplifier.
   Note: Kits, as indicated in Note #9, are no longer available from Mouser. PCBoard template: kossor.pdf

·       A Broadband HF Amplifier Using Low-Cost Power MOSFETs--Part 2 (members-only) (316,314 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   QST April 1999, pp. 43-46

·       A Simple Regen Radio for Beginners
   QST September 2000, pp 61-64
   A good project for the beginner, a school science project and Scout Radio Merit Badge. The author after receiving correspondence has additional
   Information he has graciously provided
Notes. Authors Web page.
How to Tune In A Regenerative Receiver

·       A Regenerative Receiver for Beginners (1,088,382 bytes, PDF file)
   ARRL Handbook 1995, pp. 17.68-17.72
   A modern version of the classic regenerative receiver.

·       A Binaural I-Q Receiver (members-only) (445,723 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   QST March 1999, pp. 44-48
   A receiver replaces the narrow filters and interference-fighting hardware and software of a conventional radio with a wide-open binaural I-Q
   detector. Picture listening to a chunk of the band in stereo with the signal you want smack in the middle.

·       An HF 50-W Linear Amplifier (members-only) (58,019 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   ARRL Handbook 1995, pp. 17.93-17.97
   If your QRP transmitter runs 1 to 2 watts, and you would like a little more power. Build this amplifier using a Motorola MRF477.
   Template available

·       A High Performance Communications Receiver (members-only) (947,130 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   ARRL Handbook 1990, pp. 30-8 to 30-15
   A 5-band, ssb receiver construction project.

·       The Principles and Building of SSB Gear -- Part 1 (members-only) 386,994 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   QST September 1985, pp. 17-19
   This intermediate-level series is aimed at those who want to build a small SSB transmitter and learn how SSB equipment operates. A practical
   project is described throughout the series.

  Feedback QST November 1985, p. 43 (included in above PDF file)

·       The Principles and Building of SSB Gear -- Part 2 (members-only) (300,784 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   QST October 1985, pp. 27-30
   We'll examine the speech amplifier, balanced modulator, filter, IF amplifier and carrier generator of an SSB generator.
   Feedback QST March 1986, p. 46 (included in above PDF file)

·       The Principles and Building of SSB Gear -- Part 3 (members-only) (381,843 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   QST November 1985, pp. 16-19, 43
   This installment treats the SSB-generator mixer and subsequent low-level, class-A amplifier stages.

·       The Principles and Building of SSB Gear -- Part 4 (members-only) (336,584 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   QST December 1985, pp. 37-40
   Let's discuss VFOs and examine a practical circuit for use with our SSB transmitter. Emphasis is on stability and purity of the VFO signal.

·       The Principles and Building of SSB Gear -- Part 5 (members-only) (355,979 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
   QST January 1986, pp. 29-32
   Man does not live by milliwatts alone! So let's learn how to increase our SSB exciter output power through linear amplification.

·       The WBR Receiver (members-only) Members Only
   QST August 2001, pp. 34-37
   Build a simple receiver between the regenerative and the direct-conversion receivers.
  
Feedback: QST September 2001, p. 105 (Included in above article)

Construction – Techniques:

· The Art of Soldering (21,732 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 2001, p.72
Some "tips" for good soldering.

· Collecting a Ham's Tools of the Trade (2,011,189 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1978, pp. 17-19
Use your knowledge, test gear and calculator as ham "tools." But don't forget that a good set of hand tools is also necessary.

· Screws -- Nuts -- and Things (members-only) (369,794 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 1961, pp. 30-34
How to use them in ham equipment

· How to Solder (590,936 bytes, PDF file)
QST August 1973, pp. 16-18

· The Joy of Building (2,461,096 bytes, PDF file.
QST September 1993, pp. 64-66
Put some extra pizzazz into Amateur Radio by building your own equipment!

· Building Your Own Station Accessories (members-only) (2,129,365 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1994, pp. 61-64
Sure, you can buy your own accessories, but why not build them instead? There are plenty of easy kits available.

· Try Building Your Own Equipment (384,548 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1995, pp. 39-42
You can turn those QST articles into nice-looking pieces of equipment -- and you can learn by building them.

· Homebrew Your Own Inductors! (214,213 bytes, PDF file)
QST August 1997, pp. 33-35
Can't find the inductor you need for an antenna, a tuner or amplifier? Build your own -- it's easy!
Feedback: QST October 1997, p. 83. In the second column of the sidebar, the multiplication sign under the radical is in error; that should be a plus sign (for addition).

· ARRL Single-Layer Coil Winding (L/C/F) Calculator
The original paper slide rule calculator that you can construct
(For computerized Web version, see L/C/F Calculator)

· How To Locate Manuals and Documentation
How many times have you passed up a good deal because you were certain you'd never find the service information?

· Wrinkle Finish Paint

· Printed Circuit Board Circus (members-only) (272,689 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1993, pp.79-80

· Circuit Boards From Scratch (members-only) 2,141,373 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1981, pp. 29-31
Want to Add the "professional Touch" to your next construction project? This article takes the neophyte step-by-step through the "positive" process for pc board fabrication.

· Ironing Out Your Own Printed-Circuit Boards (members-only) (2,117,260 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 1993, pp. 42-44
Here's how you can make professional-looking PC boards with little trouble and minimal cost.

· Designing and Bending Metal Enclosures (members-only) (804,275 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1980, pp.32-33
Do you get all bent out of shape when bending metal? Do lids that don't fit give you fits? This article will help you gain an understanding of metal bending -- without fatigue!

· A Homebrew. Light-Duty Metal Brake (members-only) (198,635 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1996, pp. 41-43
Tired of bending sheet metal over your knee? Try this!

· Rewinding Transformers (members-only) (2,659,851 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1980, pp. 34-37
Turned off by the high cost of power supplies? Wouldn't you like to turn a junked transformer into a custom-wound unit in less than two hours? It is easy; here's how.

· Converting Power-Line Transformers for Transmitter Service (members-only) (2,481,999 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 1980, pp. 38-42
A Surplus or junked power-line transformer can be converted easily inot a superb plate transformer for a homemade kiloatt linear amplifier. Here's how!

· Build it Yourself from QST
Part 1 (2,481,745 bytes, PDF file) -- QST April 1992, pp. 31-36
Part 2 (2,579,205 bytes, PDF file) -- QST May 1992, pp. 35-39
Part 3 (2,717,597 bytes, PDF file) -- QST June 1992, pp. 42-45
Feedback, QST June 1993, p. 73
Part 4 (1,902,619 bytes, PDF file) -- QST July 1992, pp. 31-34
Thinking about starting to build some of your own gear? Here's how to turn a QST project into reality.

· Substituting Parts (892,839 bytes, PDF file)
QST August 1992, Lab Notes, pp. 66-67

· Attaching Connectors to Coaxial Cable (members-only) (572,068 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
The ARRL Handbook, 1999, pp. 22.7-22.9

· Some Tools and Tricks of the Hobby (members-only) (3,007,777 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 2000, pp. 78-79
Technical Correspondence

· How To Read Circuit Diagrams - Part 1 (2,029,201 bytes, PDF file)
QST August 1963, pp. 39-43

· How To Read Circuit Diagrams - Part 2 (2,000,791 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1963, pp. 37-41

· Schematics at Your Fingertips
QST October 1993, pp. 39-40
Create good looking schematics with Microsoft Windows Paint.
Also see
Schematic Drawing Software, Hints & Kinks, QST December 2000 (15,849 bytes, PDF file)
(Schemat.zip) mentioned in the above H&K)

Construction Projects – Programmable IC projects

· PIC Development on a Shoestring (264,848 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1999, pp. 49-51
Some ideas on how to develop PIC-based projects.

· Bridge the Digital Divide--Basically (124,217 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 2001, pp. 30-34
The Basic Stamp is a powerful, yet friendly, digital building block that puts scores of smart circuits at your fingertips. Here's how to get started.

· A PIC of an IDer (members-only) (492,873 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 1998, pp. 36-38
A useful project and some tips on programming your own PICs.

· A Basic Stamp Morse Call-Sign Generator (members-only) (249,095 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 2000, pp. 40-41

· A Universal Logging Computer Interface (Hints and Kinks) (members-only) (167,598 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 2000, pp. 61-62
Have your automatic entry logging program get information from your rig even if the radio is not computer compatable!

· Using PIC Microcontrollers in Amateur Radio Projects (members-only) (1,699,191 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1998, pp. 34-40
Learn more about PIC microcontrollers.
Download software: picqs10.zip
Feedback: QST February 1999, p. 72

· A PIC SWR Meter (members-only) (358,466 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST December 1999, pp. 40-43
Build a computing SWR meter.

· An Inexpensive, Remote-Base Station Controller Using the Basic Stamp (members-only) 776,217 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST May 1998, pp. 33-37
Operate your home station from another location. Clubs can set up remote HF stations for all members to use,

· An Inexpensive KISS-Mode TNC (members-only) (302,458 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 2000, pp.53-56
Only 4 ICs and a small PC board.

Construction – Projects for the Hamshack:

Members Only

 

Astatic D-104 modifications:

· Adapting the Astatic D-104 Microphone for Use with Modern Transceivers (members-only) (228,709 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST August 1999, pp. 34-36
Build a simple adapter between this classic microphone and newer transceivers.

· More on D-104 Mods from W1AW, Hints & Kinks (members-only) Members Only
QST March 2001, p. 59

· More On The Astatic D-104, Hints & Kinks (members-only)
QST June 2002, pp. 61-62

· Astatic D-104 spec sheet & schematic
Courtesy of AA1DO

Yaesu FT-101 modifications

· A New Life for Your FT-101 (members-only) (Hints and Kinks) (151,851 bytes, PDF File) Members Only
QST May 1999, pp. 68-69

· Modifications to Yaesu FT-101 (members-only) Hints and Kinks) (99,410 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 1999, p. 79
Replacing the expensive, hard to find 6JS6 finals in your FT-101 with the common 6146.

· FT‑101 Power Amplifier Valves
from Ham Radio Today (RSGB) April 1998
Beware of changing the 6JS6C power amplifier valves in the venerable old FT-101 (this applies to direct replacement without circuit modification)

· Yaesu FT-101 Manuals available for download
Courtesy of AA1DO

Construction – QRP Projects:

· The MRX-40 Mini Receiver (advanced) (163,840 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1997, pp. 59-60
A tiny 40 meter amateur band Morse code receiver barely larger than a half dollar.
Rescaling the MRX-40 Receiver for 80 Meters
QST May 2001, pp. 98-99
Feedback: Rescaling the MRX-40 Receiver for 80 Meters
QST Jul 2001, p. 31

· An Automatic Sealed-Lead-Acid Battery Charger (members-only) (135,954 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 2001, pp. 43-47
Neat little charger that not only charges your Sealed Lead Acid batteries, but can keep them on trickle charge safely.

· The NJQRP Squirt (151,957 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 2001, pp. 40-43
A reduced-size 80-meter antenna designed for small lots, portable use, and a fine companion for QRP or the Warbler PSK31 Transceiver .

· A Simple 10-Meter QRP Transmitter (members-only) 413,364 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 2000, pp. 43-46
Take advantage of this 10-meter/QRP combo to get more miles per watt!

· Some QRP-Transmitter Design Tips (members-only) (373,796 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1988. Pp. 30-32
Full QSK is beneficial during QRP CW work. It is easy to achieve without relays at low power levels.

· Four Watt, QSK, for 24.9 MHz (members-only) (817,955 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1986, pp. 23-26
Here's your chance to try the 24.9-MHz WARC band at minimum cost. This transmitter is a fine mate for the 24.9-MHz converter described in April 1985 QST.

· A Two-Transistor Transmitter for 30 meters (564,542 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1984, pp. 46-47, Hints and Kinks

· An Optimized QRP Transceiver for 7 MHz (1,424,733 bytes, PDF file)
ARRL Handbook 1993, pp. 30-37 to 30-40
Here is a rig that provides a real challenge for the QRP home builder. Nonetheless, this is a classic circuit and a favorite in the QRP community.

· A QRP SSB/CW Transceiver for 14MHz -- Part 1 (682,742 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1989, pp. 18-21
Exotic circuitry and hard to find components aren't necessary if you want to build excellent performance into a home-brew SSB/CW transceiver: Careful design is the key.

· A QRP SSB/CW Transceiver for 14MHz -- Part 2 (720,967 bytes, PDF file)
QST January 1990, pp. 28-31
W7ZOI rounds out his description of a 1- or 10-W SSB/CW rig with details on its transmitter, TR switching and optional speech processor.

· The QRP Three-Bander (members-only) (2,949,379 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1989, pp. 25-30
This low-power, direct-conversion CW trnsceiver covers 18, 21 and 24 MHz, and includes sidetone, spotting and relay-less full break-in --- all on one circuit board!

· A Balanced QRP Transmatch (members-only) (850,325 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook, 1990, pp. 34-19 to 34-20

· Build A Tuna-Tin 2 (1,870,395 bytes, PDF file)
QST May 1976, pp. 14-16
Ham radio lost its kick? Go QRP with this weekend project transmitter! WAS with a 40-meter half-watter? You betcha!

· The Tuna Tin 2 Today (168,122 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 2000, pp. 37-40
The revival of a legend
Note: the TT2 Kit is now available from the Ft Smith QRP Group.
Contact Jay Bromley W5JAY for details ( w5jay@alltel.net )

· The CB Slider (members-only) (1,811,747 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 1977, pp. 15-17
Would you like to operate the Tuna Tin Two but not crazy about crystal control? Heres the answer.

· The NORCAL SIERRA: An 80-15 Meter CW Transceiver (463,425 bytes, PDF file)
ARRL Handbook 1996, pp. 17.89-17.95
This project is available as a complete kit from Wilderness Radio.
Note: Suitable substitutes for C52 can be found at several suppliers.

· A Simple and Accurate QRP Directional Wattmeter (2,741,574 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1990, pp. 19-23, 36
A directional wattmeter that's simple, portable, and accurate from 10 watts down to 5 milliwatts!

· The Miracle Whip: A Multiband QRP Antenna (members-only) (113,933 bytes. PDF file) Members Only
QST July 2001, pp. 32-35
A small portable and inexpensive to make.

· QRP-France with a "Junk Box Shorty Forty" Antenna (members-only) (128,512 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 2001, pp. 66-68
A short center-loaded 40-meter dipole for portable QRP

· Updating the W1FB 80-Meter "Sardine Sender" (members-only) (187,658 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 2001, pp. 54-56
Build a “modern” version of this old classic QRP transmitter.

· Feedback: March 2002, p. 42 – The value of capacitors C6, C8, C9 and C12 should be 0.1uF

Construction – Servicing and Troublshooting:

· Troubleshooting Your Radio Equipment (792,557 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1993, pp. 65-66
Troubleshooting your equipment is easier than you think.

· Electronic Troubleshooting -- Lab Notes (26,358 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1995, pp. 87-88

· Some Basics For Equipment Servicing -- Part 1 (955,820 bytes PDF file)
QST December 1981, pp. 11-14
Costly repairs to amateur equipment can often be avoided if we do our own repair work. Knowing the nature of semiconductors is a vital means to that end.

· Some Basics For Equipment Servicing -- Part 2 (1,856,673 bytes, PDF file)
QST January 1982, pp. 38-41
Dc voltage measurements are fundamental to troubleshooting amateur equipment. We'll look at how to make these measurements and show you a "hi-Z" voltmeter you can build in a weekend.

· Some Basics For Equipment Servicing -- Part 3 (1,704,339 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1982, pp. 40-44
Using the proper techniques can speed equipment servicing. The methods are easy, and you can build the test gear!

· Some Basics For Equipment Servicing -- Part 4 (2,962,839 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1982, pp. 40-44
Knowing how to use the oscilloscope effectively as a troubleshooting tool will move you to the front of the equipment servicing class.

· How to Measure Large Direct Current with Common Meters (members-only) (253,233 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 1996, pp. 40-43
Multimeters and panel meters seldom measure more than 10 A. Sense resistors and meter shunts can help -- for pennies apiece!

· Testing A Sideband Transmitter (members-only) (1,259,822 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 1965, pp. 14-18
A primer of simple tests and adjustments.
(This article is for those servicing vintage transmitters from the mid ‘60s and ‘70s. -Ed.)

· FT‑101 Power Amplifier Valves from Ham Radio Today (RSGB) April 1998
Beware of changing the 6JS6C power amplifier valves in the venerable old FT-101 (this applies to direct replacement without circuit modification)

· Swept Receiver Dynamic Range Testing in the ARRL Laboratory (members-only) (139,306 bytes, PDF file)
QEX June 1996, pp. 3-12

· Improved Dynamic-Range Testing (members-only) (899,952 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX Jul/Aug 2002, pp. 46-52

Construction – Surface Mount Technology

· The World's Smallest Code-Practice Oscillator (104,455 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 2001, pp. 39-41
A very small and flexible code-practice oscillator using surface-mount devices.

· The Mystique Behind Miniaturization - Surface Mount Technology (1,976,008 bytes, PDF file)
QST, October 1987, pp. 15-18
Pocket-size hand-helds, TVs the size of a watch – isn't it amazing? Here’s a look at some of what makes this compactness possible.

· A Surface-Mount Technology Primer - Part 1 (1,807,550 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1990, pp. 48-51
What makes today's compact electronics gear possible?

· A Surface-Mount Technology Primer - Part 2 (2,190,736 bytes, PDF file)
QST January 1991, pp. 27-30
Here's more on surface-mount devices - their makeup, where to get them and how to work with them.

· Surface Mount Technology - You Can Work with It! - Part 1 (339,191 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1999, pp. 33-39
Start building your own projects with surface-mount devices! I'll show you how!

· Surface Mount Technology - You Can Work with It! – Part 2 (144,364 bytes, PDF file)
QST May 1999, pp. 48-50

· Surface Mount Technology - You Can Work with It! - Part 3 (182,325 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1999, pp. 34-36

· Surface Mount Technology - You Can Work with It! - Part 4 (376,198 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1999, pp. 38-41

· SMALL: A Surface-Mount Amplifier that's Little - and LOUD! (54,554 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1996, pp. 41-42, 68
A simple project using surface mount technology yet gives you a high quality audio amplifier.

Construction – Test Equipment Projects:

· The Tandem Match -- An Accurate Directional Wattmeter (members-only) (969,445 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
The ARRL Handbook, 1999, pp. 22.36 -- 22.42

· A Spectrum Analyzer for the Radio Amateur -- Part 1 (182,720 bytes, PDF file)
QST August 1998, pp. 35-43
Simple and easy to build, this radio-frequency spectrum analyzer is capable of useful measurements in the 50kHz to 70 MHz region.

· A Spectrum Analyzer for the Radio Amateur -- Part 2 (245,857 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1998, pp. 37-40
Feedback -- QST November 1999, p. 74

· A GPS-Based Frequency Standard (members-only) (814,582 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 1998, pp. 37-44
Build this modern and highly accurate frequency standard that uses the GPS timing pulse instead of WWV.
Feedback: QST October 1998, p. 81. Figure 3, reverse the identities of R5 and R6.

· Build a Return Loss Bridge (members-only) (164,585 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 1997, pp. 34-36
Used with your DVM, this simple bridge, diode detector and return loss techniques can help you measure cable loss and SWR at the antenna

· A Pocket-Size, Direct-Reading VHF SWR Meter (members-only) (207,352 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1997, pp. 33-36
This easy-to-build LED bargraph SWR meter goes with you anywhere.

· A Relative-Indication Audible Meter Reader (members-only) (141,381 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 1997, pp. 36-39
This simple circuit allows blind - and sighted - hams to identify meter readings audibly.

· A Simple and Accurate QRP Directional Wattmeter (members-only) (6,028,700 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1990, pp. 19-23, 36
A directional wattmeter that's simple, portable, and accurate from 10 watts down to 5 milliwatts!

· The (Not Quite) Ultimate Dummy Load (members-only) (1,863,354 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 1981, pp. 35-37
This dummy load made from carbon resistors will dissipate 132 watts.

· Simple RF-Power Measurement (members-only) (264,217 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 2001, pp. 38-43
Measure power from nanowatts to 100 watts
Feedback: QST August 2001, p. 76 (36,344 bytes, PDF file)

· Swept Receiver Dynamic Range Testing in the ARRL Laboratory (members-only) (139,306 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX June 1996, pp. 3-12

· Improved Dynamic-Range Testing (members-only) (899,952 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX Jul/Aug 2002, pp. 46-52

Construction – Tube Amplifiers:

· Using Solid-State Transceivers With Older Tube Amplifiers (members-only) (39,693 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
A collection of Hints and Kinks from the pages of QST

· How to Test and Align a Linear Amplifier (members-only) (1,617,794 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1952, pp. 39-43, 128
Alignment procedure for an old tube type SSB amplifier.

· How To Run Your (Tube Type - Ed.) Linear (members-only) (975,720 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 1962, pp. 11-14
What it can do and what it shouldn’t do.

· A Single 6146 Amplifier (members-only) (one 6146, 70-90 watts) (1,392,201 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1959, pp. 196-198

· An All-Purpose 813 Amplifier (members-only) (one 813) (1,244,174 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1959, pp. 199-201

· A Compact 650-Watt Amplifier (members-only) (two 4X250B) (2,091,734 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1959, pp. 205-209

· 4-250-A's in a 1-Kw. Final ((members-only) two 4-250A) (2,648,850 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1959, pp. 210-214

· A High-Power grounded-Grid Amplifier and Power Supply (members-only) (one 3-1000Z) (2,139,553 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1968, pp. 199-204

· One-Band Kilowatt Amplifiers (members-only) (two 813) (1,25/8,687 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1968, pp. 195-198

· A Compact 3-400Z Grounded-Grid Amplifier (members-only) (one 3-400Z) (1,308,857 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1968, pp. 191-194

· An 811-A 200-Watt Grounded-Grid Linear Amplifier (members-only) (one 811-A) (1,179,474 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1968, pp. 187-190

· Using 2 3-500ZS In grounded Grid (members-only) (1,351,014 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1971, pp. 201-204

· A One-Kilowatt Amplifier Using A 3-500Z (members-only) (675,237 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1972, pp. 182-186

· The SS-2000 Amplifier (members-only) (one 3-1000Z) (1,477,098 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1972, pp. 178-182

· A Sweep-Tube Linear Amplifier (members-only) (four 6KD6) (1,201,283 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1972, pp. 176-178

· A 160-Meter Amplifier (members-only) (two 572-B) (1,111,682 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1978, pp. 184-186

· A Conduction-Cooled Two-Kilowatt Amplifier (members-only) (two 8873) (1,943,097 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1978, pp. 186-190

· A Two-Kilowatt Amplifier Using the Eimac 8877 Triode (members-only) (one 8877 or 3CX1500) (2,080,841 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1978, pp. 190-195

· 1500-W-Output Amplifier for 160 Meters (members-only) (3CX1500A7) (1,450,439 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1990, pp. 30-46 to 30-49

· A Legal-Limit Amplifier for 160 through 10 Meters (members-only) (8877) (3,168,225 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1990, pp. 30-50 to 30-57

· A 160- to 10-Meter Amplifier Using the 3CX1200A7 (members-only) (2,080,071 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook 1990, pp. 30-58 to 30-63

· The LKA-1 Linear Amplifier (members-only) (two 4CX250B) (3,005,289 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 1975, pp. 39-43, 158

· A Table-Top Half Kilowatt (members-only) (two 811A) (3,111,439 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 1960, pp. 24-27, 156, 158

· The RCC 230-L Amplifier (members-only) (two 807s, 230 watts) (3,209,186 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1963, pp. 29-32

· A Compact High-Power Linear (members-only) (four 811A) (1,149,475 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 1961, pp. 11-14

· An 800-Watt P.E.P. Input Linear (members-only) (two 7094) (529,479 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 1959, pp. 11-13, 140

Construction – VHF Projects:

· The DSP-10: An All-Mode 2-Meter Transceiver Using a DSP IF and PC-Controlled Front Panel -- Part 1 (626,393 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1999, pp. 33-41
What's neat about this 2-meter transceiver is that most of it is in software! Your PC is its front panel.

· The DSP-10: An All-Mode 2-Meter Transceiver Using a DSP IF and PC-Controlled Front Panel -- Part 2 QST October 1999, pp. 34-40
With most of the radio in software, the mechanical construction of the radio is much easier to handle.

· The DSP-10: An All-Mode 2-Meter Transceiver Using a DSP IF and PC-Controlled Front Panel -- Part 3 (2,108,685 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1999, pp. 42-45
This is it! It's about time to put your new transceiver on the air.
Notes: additional Web link
Kit may be available from TAPR

· An Ultra-Simple VHF Receiver for 6 Meters (187,078 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1997, pp. 39-41
This receiver uses superregeneration for high sensitivity and low parts count.

· A Pocket-Size, Direct-Reading VHF SWR Meter (members-only) (207,336 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1997, pp. 33-36
This easy-to-build LED bargraph SWR meter goes with you anywhere.
(template)

· DAS--DTMF Accessory Squelch (members-only) 268,631 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST December 1995, pp. 25-31 Object code das.zip
Easy on your ears and nerves -- this DTMF decoder silently monitors a radio channel alerting you only when a designated identifier is recognized.

· An Experimental Solid-State Kilowatt Linear Amplifier for 2 to 54 MHz (members-only) (3,177,342 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 1992, pp. 19-23
This is not a step-by-step construction article, but a springboard from which to build a 35-pound kilowatt solid-state amplifier.

· A Compact 1-kW 2-50 MHz Solid-State Amplifier (members-only) (4,542,204 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX July 1990, pp. 3-8

· How to Build and Use a VHF Wattmeter (members-only) (1,946,574 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST December 1987, pp. 15-19
You can measure SWR and RF power at VHF with an inexpensive homemade instrument. Here's a VHF power bridge that you can build during a weekend.

· Construct A VHF/UHF Signal Generator (members-only) (1,506,725 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1986, pp. 33-34
Most builders need an inexpensive VHF/UHV signal source for project testing. Beat the high cost of commercial gear with this simple 50 MHz to 1296 MHz circuit.

· A 2-Meter Transmatch With S.W.R. Indicator (members-only) (699,384 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 1969, pp. 39-41

· A Compact "Brick" for 6 Meters (members-only) (1,967,966 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1990, pp. 18-21
Build a 6-meter 100 watt amplifier using a MRF140 FET.

· A No-Bandswitch, Dual-Band VHF Desktop Amplifier (members-only) (929,088 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX Jul/Aug 2000
Using a pair of 3CX800A7s, this 6- and 2-meter amplifier yields the legal-limit.
Note: QEX projects are not step-by-step articles for the beginner.

· A Transmatch for 50 and 144 MHz With SWR Indicator (members-only) (1,122,471 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
The Radio Amateur’s VHF Manual, 3dr, Edition (1972)

· An 8-Watt, 2-Meter “Brickette” (626,250 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 2000, pp. 43-47
Put 20 mW into this amplifier and get 26-dB increase in power. (can be companion to the DSP-10)

· A Low-Loss VHF/UHF Diplexer (members-only) (1,153,459 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX Mar/Apr 2002, pp. 47-51
This project lets you use one feedline for both VHF and UHF energy, simultaneously!

· A Low-Loss VHF/UHF Bias Tee (members-only) (279,405 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX May/June 2002, pp. 52-54
A simple circuit that lets you superimpose DC control voltage onto the transmission line without altering the RF characteristics.

Construction – Tube HF Transmitters and Receivers:

· Clean Up Your Signals with Band-Pass Filters - Part 1 (members-only) (84,538 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1998, pp. 44-48
These inexpensive, easily built filters can be the buffer you need between the signals you want to hear and send and those you don't!

· Clean Up Your Signals with Band-Pass Filters - Part 2 (members-only) (137,290 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 1998, pp. 39-42
You're now much closer to saying goodbye to your unwanted signal problems!

· A Simple Transmitter (members-only) (2,284,842 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
A Simple Receiver (members-only) (3,247,586 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
How To Become A Radio Amateur, 1955
Many of us started with these - a single 6V6 and a single 3S4.

· DCS-500 Double-Conversion Superheterodyne Receiver (members-only) (2,182,518 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
The Radio Amateur's Handbook, 1964, pp. 133-139
This ham band 80 -10 five tube (6BA6, 6U8A), two transistor receiver includes a 100-kHz calibrator.

· An Inexpensive 75-Watt Transmitter (members-only) (1,421,982 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
The Radio Amateur's Handbook, 1964, pp. 172-175
This crystal controlled transmitter for 80-, 40-, 20-, 15-, and 10-meters uses a 12BY7 and a 1625.

· A Direct-Conversion Receiver for Beginners (members-only) (1,997,636 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
The Radio Amateur's Handbook, 1971, pp. 137-142
This solid-state receiver tunes from 3.5 to 4 MHz in its basic form, and covers 40-, 20-, 15-, and 10-meter bands with plug-in converters.

· A Receiving Package for 1.8 to 144 MHz (members-only) (2,221,233 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
The Radio Amateur's Handbook, 1971, pp. 142-149

· The "Novice Special" Transmitter (members-only) (802,874 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
The Radio Amateur's Handbook, 1971, pp. 181-183
This 15-watt, 80- and 40-meter cw transmitter was intended for the novice constructor. It uses a 6C4 and a 5763.

· A 75- to 120-Watt CW Transmitter (members-only) (1,206,273 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
The Radio Amateur's Handbook, 1971, pp. 184-187
This transmitter uses a 6GK6 and the famous 6146B.

· FT‑101 Power Amplifier Valves from Ham Radio Today (RSGB) April 1998
Beware of changing the 6JS6C power amplifier valves in the venerable old FT-101 (this applies to direct replacement without circuit modification)

Digital Modes: Operating and Projects:

Digital Signal Processing:

· Signals, Samples and Stuff: A DSP Tutorial - Part 1 (1,013,741 bytes, PDF file)
QEX, March 1998, pp. 3-16
DSP is a buzzword for the '90s. Have you wonder what it's all about?

· Signals, Samples and Stuff: A DSP Tutorial - Part 2 (1,370,214 bytes, PDF file)
QEX, May 1998, pp. 22-37
Let's look inside an IF-DSP transceiver.

· Signals, Samples and Stuff: A DSP Tutorial - Part 3 (1,139,411 bytes, PDF file)
QEX, July 1998, pp. 13-27
Advances DSP techniques.

· Signals, Samples and Stuff: A DSP Tutorial - Part 4 (1,959,086 bytes, PDF file)
QEX, September 1998, pp. 19-29
Conclusion.

· Digital Signal Processing for the Experimenter (1,081,344 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1984, pp22-27
Flash - A/D-igital data stream replaces an analog signal. DAC puts it back again!

· An Introduction to Digital Signal Processing (1,146,880 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1991, pp35-37
DSP makes headlines even in an age where digital seems to be applied to just about everything electronic - and now it's part of Amateur Radio.

· "Digital Signal Processing: A Practical Approach"
A book review

· The DSP-10: An All-Mode 2-Meter Transceiver Using a DSP IF and PC-Controlled Front Panel -- Part 1 (626,393 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1999, pp. 33-41
What's neat about this 2-meter transceiver is that most of it is in software! Your PC is its front panel.

· The DSP-10: An All-Mode 2-Meter Transceiver Using a DSP IF and PC-Controlled Front Panel -- Part 2 (1,304,518 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 1999, pp. 34-40
With most of the radio in software, the mechanical construction of the radio is much easier to handle.

· The DSP-10: An All-Mode 2-Meter Transceiver Using a DSP IF and PC-Controlled Front Panel -- Part 3 (2,108,685 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1999, pp. 42-45
This is it! It's about time to put your new transceiver on the air.
Notes: additional Web link
Kit may be available from TAPR

· An 8-Watt, 2-Meter "Brickette" (626,250 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 2000, pp. 43-47
Put 20 mW into this amplifier and get 26-dB increase in power. (can be companion to the DSP-10)

Direction Finding:

· Stalking the Fox (members-only) (234,778 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1993, pp. 64-65
An introduction to Fox Hunting (Direction Finding)

· Transmitter Hunting: Tracking Down the Fun--Part 1 (members-only) (2,003,940 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 1993, pp. 48-51
More general information on Fox Hunting

· Transmitter Hunting: Tracking Down The Fun--Part 2 (members-only) (2,058,076 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1993, pp. 56-58

· Build the HANDI-Finder! (members-only) (835,243 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1993, pp. 35-38
A hand-held direction finder that when connected to your HT or FM scanner can locate AM or FM sources over the range or 45 to 470 MHz

· The NVARC FoxFinder (members-only) (170,276 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 2001, pp. 35-39
This little fox hunt sniffer is designed to locate the transmitter down to the last few meters--where other techniques often fail

· A Doppler Radio-Direction Finder Part 1 (members-only) (691,450 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1999, pp. 35-40
This four-antenna system used the Doppler effect to track down a signal.

· A Doppler Radio - Direction Finder Part 2 (members-only) (179,174 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 1999, pp. 37-40

· The Four-Way Dfer (members-only) (376,266 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 1995, pp. 29-35
A system outwardly similar to the Doppler Radio unit above, but with a different approach--multipath reception.
Feedback: December 1995, p. 79 (6,770 bytes, PDF file)
Feedback: February 1996, p. 81 (5,195 bytes, PDF file)

· A Fox-Hunting DF Twin 'Tenna (members-only) 130,431 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1998, pp. 41-44
An improved 2 meter Yagi optimized for direction finding.
Feedback: The ferrite beads specified in Table 2 are all available from All Electronics Corp

Emergency/Alternative Power:

· Lab Notes - Emergency Power
It's nearly time for the most popular operating event of the year-Field Day!

· Practical Battery Back-Up Power for Amateur Radio Stations - Part 1 (members-only) (1,179,648 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 1990, pp. 34-37
Many radio amateurs use batteries only in low-power, portable/mobile applications. This three part series covers how to use batteries to keep a ham station going when commercial ac power fails.

· Practical Battery Back-Up Power for Amateur Radio Stations - Part 2 (members-only) (1,540,096 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 1990, pp. 32-35
Feedback: (8,323 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1990, p.39

· Practical Battery Back-Up Power for Amateur Radio Stations - Part 3 (members-only) (1,048,576 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1990, pp. 25-27

· Solar Power for Your Ham Station-It's Easier than You Think (members-only) (196,608 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 1996, pp. 33-37
Everything you need to know to operate your 100 watt station exclusively by solar/battery power.

· A Solar-Powered Field Day (members-only) (124,330 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1995, pp. 60-63
Run a whole station off a small gel-cell battery replenished by a solar panel.

· Watts From Wind (members-only) (1,736,704 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 1977, pp. 15-19
Put together a wind powered generator.

· Alternative Energy--An Overview of Options and Requirements--Part 1 (members-only) (1,935,169 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 1987, pp. 17-21
A view for using sun, water and wind energy to power your station.

· Alternative Energy--An Overview of Options and Requirements--Part 2 (members-only) (1,307,889 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1987, pp. 19-23

· How to Choose and Use a Portable Power Generator (members-only) (189,376 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 1999, pp. 59-61

· The 12 Volt Pup: A DC Generator You Can Build (members-only) (334,364 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 1997, pp.45-48
50 AMP generator from a lawn-mower and an alternator

Grid Squares:

· Lab Notes - Where Am I?
QST April 1994, pp. 86-88
Everything You've Always Wanted to Know About Coordinates and Grid Squares But Were Afraid to Ask.

· Conversion Between Geodetic and Grid Locator Systems (members-only) (360,448 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST Jan 1989, pp. 29-30, 43
This simple paper system lets you convert latitudes and longitudes to grid locators.

· Grid Locators and Grid Squares
About Grid Locators and Grid Squares

· Calculate Grid Square
Enter your latitude and longitude.

· Location by City and State
This form lets you find the county, ARRL section, ARRL division, grid squares and latitude/longitude of a location (city and state) in the US.

Filters – RF:

· Bandstop Filters for Attenuating High-Level Broadcast-Band Signals (members-only) (368,958 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX November 1995, pp. 3-12

· A No-Tune 2-Meter Bandpass Filter (members-only) (269,473 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 2000, pp. 54-55
A homebrew solution to annoying intermod

· Narrow Band-Pass Filters for HF (members-only) (313,893 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX Sept/Oct 2000, pp. 13-17
The ability to attenuate frequencies above and below a particular band can be very useful to both the contester and the casual operator.

· Receiver Band-Pass Filters Having Maximum Attenuation in Adjacent Bands (members-only) (349,219 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX July/Aug 1999, pp. 27-33

· Clean Up Your Signals with Band-Pass Filters - Part 1 (members-only) (84,538 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1998, pp. 44-48

· Clean Up Your Signals with Band-Pass Filters - Part 2 (members-only) (78,309 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 1998, pp. 39-42

· Dunestar Model 600 Multiband Bandpass Filter (members-only) (168,829 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST March 1995, pp. 85-86
This is an in-line filter that operates on both transmit and receive. Its primary application is reducing interference between stations operating in close proximity.

· A Diode-Switched Band-Pass Filter (members-only) (843,518 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 1991, pp. 24-26
How to use high-speed silicon diodes as RF switches for selecting two or more filters.

· Band-Pass Filters for HF Transceivers (members-only) (1,051,773 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 1988, pp. 17-19, 23

Ham Radio History:

· The American Radio Relay League: How it came to be (members-only)  Members Only
Adapted from 200 Meters & Down
The story of the 'spark' that started the ARRL

· An Overview of Amateur Call Signs - Past and Present (members-only) (3,343,352 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1994, pp. 54-59
There's some history behind that call sign of yours - check it out!

· A W1AW Vignette (members-only) (3,725,877 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1988, pp. 49-59, 109
A Concise History of the ARRL Headquarters Station

· Samuel F. B. Morse: Radio's Mysterious Progenitor (members-only) (2,266,976 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 1991, pp. 51-54
This pioneer of electrical communications was as enigmatic as his code. Here's a fascinating look at his life - the amazing twists and turns that would eventually influence our lives so profoundly. (also see Web link below - Ed.)

· Remembering Hugo Gernsback (members-only) (1,978,208 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1995, pp. 37-39
Or, for those too young to remember, an exciting introduction…

· The Father of Modern Radio (members-only) (1,689,151 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1991, pp. 49-51
Perhaps no single person has done as much as Edwin Howard Armstrong to advance the art of radio communication.

· Before Spark (members-only) (1,474,610 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 1994, pp. 57-59
Sure that long-distance wireless communications was just around the corner, early researchers telegraphed through water, air and earth by various means that sometimes tantalizingly resembled radio.

· The Final Days of Ham Spark (members-only) (2,215,100 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 1992, pp. 29-32
Generations before today's ham nostalgists took up the plaint that "real radios glow in the dark," the realest real radios whined. Roared and hurled blue lightning.

· Yagi: The Man and His Antenna (members-only) (1,064,329 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1993, pp. 45-47
While Armstrong, De Forest and Sarnoff were warring over Stateside radio inventions, the Yagi-Uda beam antenna was quietly emerging in Tokyo.

· Radio Gear of Yesteryear (members-only) (1,367,641 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 1994, pp. 41-43, 57
Here's another look at the era in which CW wasn't just a synonym for Morse code - a time when spark, arc and alternator vied for commercial and military dollars as the best means of getting radio messages through.

· Hams Span the Atlantic on Shortwave! (members-only) (645,259 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST December 1996, pp. 28-31
Only 75 years ago, hams transmitted the first shortwave radio signals across the Atlantic…20 years, to the day, after Marconi sent the letter S across the same ocean.

· Amateur Radio and World War II (members-only)  (3,407,863 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST August 1995, pp. 40-44
And the impact each had on the other...

· Ham Radio in the Pacific at the end of WW II (members-only) (1,478,316 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 1994, pp. 46-47
After four years of waiting, hams were anxious to get back on the air...

· The Way We Were: Amateur Radio in the 50's (members-only) (2,003,154 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1995, pp. 56-58
Turn the calendar back 40 years and get a peek at ham radio in the days of Ozzie and Harriert!

· The 811A: Grandfather of the Zero-Bias Revolution (members-only) (177,225 bytes, PDF file)
Members OnlyQST April 1996, pp. 51-53
Here's the story of how Amateur Radio ingenuity - with help from World War II and the advent of SSB - fueled a technological upheaval in the high-power vacuum-tube industry.

· Keeping Track of OSCAR: A Short History of Amateur Radio's Race for Space (members-only) (901,581 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 1999, pp. 65-66
Making contacts through a long chain of ever-more-sophisticated Amateur Radio satellites has made satellite QSOs an everyday occurrence. This is a fascinating look at our first steps into space...

· The Man Before Marconi (members-only) (400,454 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST August 1948, pp. 42-44
A biography of Dr. Mahlon Loomis

Internet Ham Radio:

· A New "Band" for Your Radio (members-only) Members Only
QST December 1996, pp. 37-40
Amateur Radio and the Web combine to deliver another way of having fun!

· The Internet -- Repeater connection (members-only) (69,692 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST December 1997, p.90

· So You Want to Talk on the Internet.... (members-only) (85,453 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 1998, p. 94

· WinLink 2000: A Worldwide HF BBS (98,566 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 2000, p. 90
Software allows messages to pass between an amateur radio station and the Internet.

· WinLink 2000-Internet E-mail from Anywhere! (members-only)  Members Only
QST January 2001, p. 51
Sidebar to The HF Digital "Tower of Babel" (members-only) Members Only
WinLink and APRS Mated (members-only) Members Only
Update: From Digital Dimension, QST March, 2001, p.106,

· Remote-Controlled HF Operation over the Internet (members-only) (113,719 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
If you can’t get on the air from home, the Internet may be the answer.

· International Boat Watch Net Locates Pleasure Vessels at Sea
ARRL News
Yachtsmen who cruise the world's oceans for pleasure communicate primarily by HF radio.

· The HF Digital "Tower of Babel" (members-only) (143,706 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 2001, pp. 50-53
A thumbnail of ten digital modes

· A Conversation With...Mike Cook, AF9Y (254,949 bytes, PDF file)
QST May 1998, pp. 50-51
Talks about WinLink QST November 2001, pp. 47-48

· I-Link, the .WAV of the Future (members-only) (360,796 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST march 2002, pp. 38-42
Hardware and software solutions to working world-wide DX on VHF/UHF

Laser Communications:

· A Laser Communications Primer -- Part 1 (2,880,281 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1990, pp. 19-24
A tutorial on lasers and how they work.

· A Laser Communications Primer -- Part 2 (2,420,832 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 1990, pp. 22-26
Make a laser communications system from a laser tag game.

· Lasers and Amateur Radio (members-only) (491,562 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX January 1985, pp. 5-10
An introduction to lasers.

· Laser Communication Range (members-only) (109,004 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 1989, p. 74
Calculating the range of a laser communications system.

· A Laser Transceiver for the ARRL 10-GHz-and-Up Contest (members-only) (883,186 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX November/December 2001, pp.11-19
An optical transceiver you can build to get on the 6500-A band

Lightning Protection:

· Lightning Protection for the Amateur Radio Station -- Part 1 (656,619 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 2002, pp. 56-59
A three part serried that develops a plan for protection the amateur station.

· Lightning Protection for the Amateur Radio Station -- Part 2 (214,744 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 2002, pp. 48-52
Resources: Manufacturers and suppliers of lightning protection products

· Lightning Protection for the Amateur Radio Station -- Part 3 (137,486 bytes, PDF file)

· Lab Notes - Lightning Protection - Part 1 (229,376 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 1994, pp. 81-82

· Lab Notes - Lightning Protection - Part 2 (262,144 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1994. pp. 45-46

· Electromagnetic Pulse and the Radio Amateur - Part 1 (1,114,112 bytes, PDF file)
QST August 1986, pp. 15-20, 36
Will your station survive the effects of lightning strikes ........

· Electromagnetic Pulse and the Radio Amateur - Part 2 (163,840 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1986, pp. 22-26
...testing EMP/transient-protection devices

· Electromagnetic Pulse and the Radio Amateur - Part 3 (509,824 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 1986, pp. 38-41
...protectors are connected to Amateur Radio equipment and retested.

· Electromagnetic Pulse and the Radio Amateur - Part 4 (589,824 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1986, pp. 30-34
What can be done to protect an Amateur radio station from lightning......
Feedback: QST February 1987, p. 43
Feedback: QST April 1987, p. 59

Link and Remote Control:

· The WB2 "REMote" Link (members-only) (536,976 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 1995, pp. 29-34
With this system going for you, you need never be out of reach of your radio station.

· Remote Operation Comes Home (members-only) (507,517 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 1996, pp. 46-50
Personal computers combine with today's sophisticated HF transceivers to make remotely controlled stations more feasible than ever.

· A 10 GHz Remote-Control System for HF Transceivers (members-only) (310,606 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX March/April 1999, pp. 9-15
Have you ever wondered what that computer-controlled port on the back of your new transceiver is for? This system provides the building blocks for putting it to good use.

· Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Hardware for Computer-Controlling Modern Radios (members-only) (1,566,692 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1993, pp.37-41
Want to interface your ICOM, Kenwood, Ten-Tec or Yaesu transceiver to your computer? Here are the basics -- and easy-to-build interface circuits for each.

· Computer Remote Control of an Amateur Radio Station (members-only) (2,334,205 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 1991, pp. 25-30
Computer Control for Mobile Ham Radio Operation (members-only) (126,669 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1997, pp. 44-47 Members Only
A simple interconnect, some software and an inexpensive palmtop make mobile remote control easy!

· A Radio-Control Primer (members-only) (model planes and boats) [2,733,666 bytes, PDF file] Members Only
QST February 1992, pp. 18-22
Has Dxing got you down? Ragchewing lost its luster? Morse code suddenly too cryptic? Radio-Controlled flying, boating or driving is an exhilarating way to enjoy Amateur Radio. These hams love it -- and you will too.

· A DTMF to RS-232-C Converter and HF-Link Controller (members-only) (97,663 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 1995, pp. 35-37

· An Inexpensive, Remote-Base Station Controller Using the Basic Stamp (members-only)  Members Only
QST May 1998, pp. 33-37
Operate your home station from another location. Clubs can set up remote HF stations for all members to use,

Mobile – Automotive:

· On the Road: The Joys of HF Mobile (members-only) (275,080 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST December 1997, pp.51-54
A mobile primer with hints on placing antennas on "plastic" cars.

· An HF Mobile Installation--Step By Step (members-only) (249,352 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 2001, pp. 65-69
This one leads you through the installation of a mobile HF station, from battery to antenna. (Additional information)
Feedback: The FT-900 Product Review appeared in QST February 1995

· The Quest for Power--Part 1 (members-only) (15,704 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 2001, p. 97 (Radios To Go)
Detailed tips on how to get power from your automobile's battery to your mobile station.

· The Quest for Power--Finale (members-only) (18,751 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 2001, p.107 (Radios To Go)

· Satellite DXing "To Go" (members-only) (91,398 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 2002, pp. 40-43
Working the Amateur Satellites from a mobile.

Mobile – Marine:

· Casting Off With Ham Radio (917,504 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1989, pp. 53-55
Combining boating and ham radio can be both useful and fun. Here is how one ham gets his kicks.

· Mobile Marine Under Sail (members-only) (1,376,256 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 1976, pp.18-21
Own a boat, or thinking of getting one? Don't forget to take Amateur Radio along when you hit the water!

· Marine Mobile Revisited (members-only) (1,815,448 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST December 1976, pp. 51-53
Anchor, plug the rig in and work the world! It’s easy and fun. Here are more maritime hints and kinks from an extended Caribbean cruise.

Morse/CW – Coherent CW:

·       Coherent CW (891,844 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1975, pp. 26-27
Amateur radio's new state of the art?

·       Coherent CW -- The Concept -- Part 1 (369,331 bytes, PDF file)
QST May 1981, pp. 11-14
Would you think that you could decrease your transmitter output power by a factor of 10 and increase signal readability by the same amount -- simultaneously? It's being done now.

·       Coherent CW -- The Practical Aspects -- Part 2 (404,922 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1981, pp. 18-23
You'll now see how you can put the concept into practice.

·       A DSP Version of Coherent-CW (CCW) (652,378 bytes, PDF file)
QEX February 1994, pp. 25-30
Obtain the advantages of coherent detection of Morse signals using DSP.

Propagation:

·       The Sun, the Earth, the Ionosphere:
What the Numbers Mean, and Propagation Predictions--a brief introduction to propagation and the major factors affecting it. By Carl Luetzelschwab, K9LA

·       An Introduction to Gray-Line DXing (members-only) (1,677,864 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 1992, pp. 80-82
The transitions from darkness to daylight and daylight to darkness cause drastic changes in the ionosphere. Use this to your DX advantage.

·       Catch a Falling Star (members-only) (157,059 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1997, pp. 63-67
A Beginner's guide to meteor-scatter communication.

·       Sporadic E--A Mystery Solved? Part 1 (members-only) (41,220 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1997, pp. 39-41
One of the world's leading ionospheric scientists explains the physics of sporadic E.

·       Sporadic E--A Mystery Solved? Part 2 (members-only) (158,602 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 1997, pp. 38-42

·       HF Propagation: The Basics (1,003,127 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1983, pp. 11-15
Say it's 10 P.M. in Savannah, and you'd like to reach out and QSO someone in southern Europe. A solid knowledge of how signals travel will help you decide if you've got a fighting chance.

·       Radio Waves And Communications Distance (members-only) (720,896 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST, January 1985, pp. 31-33

·       Here Comes the Sun
QST, Lab Notes, October 1996, pp. 74-75

·       Radio Waves and the Ionosphere (members-only) (608,079 Bytes, PDF File) Members Only
QST, November 1999, pp. 62-64

·       Propagation Broadcasts and Forecasts Demystified (members-only) (1,853,939 Bytes, PDF File) Members Only
QST November 1991, pp. 20-25 

QRPQRP Home Page – lots of links to articles and other sites

QRP – Commercial QRP radios and kits:

· Impressions of the Elecraft K2 Transceiver (members-only) (26,034 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 2001, p. 99
Rich, K7SZ, QST QRP Column Editor, gives his personal impression of this popular transceiver.

· Low-Power Transceiver Kits You Can Build( 476,079 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1996, pp. 45-50
A Comprehensive roundup of the most popular QRP transceiver kits on the market in recent years. (A & A Engineering, Oak Hills Research, S & S Engineering, Small Wonder Labs, Wilderness Radio)

· Elecraft K2 HF Transceiver Kit -- Product review (363,045 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 2000, pp. 69-74
Elecraft K2 HF Transceiver Kit -- Expanded Test Report (286,234 bytes, PDF file) (members-only)

· QRP Transceiver Kits: Six Reports from the Field (members-only) Members Only
QST December 2000, pp. 28-32
The ARRL Lab compiles six QRP kit reviews written by their builders.

· Three Cool Kits (members-only) (75,759 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 2000, p. 93 (QRP Power)
NorCal 40A, Small Wonder Labs SW 40+, Red Hot Radio NC 20

QRP – Heathkit “Classic” Rigs:

·       The HW-7
   HW-7 QRP Transceiver Modifications (977,507 bytes, PDF file)
   QST January 1974, pp. 35-39
   Feedback, QST, March 1974, p. 83
   (template) [33,767 bytes, PDF file]

·       The HW-8
   Putting the Boots to Your HW-8 QRP Transceiver (1,159,355 bytes, PDF file)
   QST April 1979, pp. 18-21
   A signal increase of 9 dB for your QRP rig can turn marginal QSOs into solid ones! This amplifier provides 80- through 15-meter signal
   increase with only 1 watt of drive. Add these "boots" to your HW-8 and improve your QRP DX score.

   30-Meter Conversion For The HW-8 (188,418 bytes, PDF file)
   QST May 1984, p. 44

·       The HW-9
   Improving the HW-9 Transceiver (2,161,943 bytes, PDF file)
   QST April 1988, pp. 26-29
   If you own an HW-9 or other QRP transceiver, you'll find these ideas will add to your operating enjoyment. So, heat up that soldering iron!
   HW-9 Tips (165,227 bytes, PDF file)
   QST October 1988, p. 43-44
   Feedback -- QST December 1988, p. 32.
   In the October 1988 QST Technical Correspondence item, "HW-9 Tips," pp. 42-43, U1 was not identified. U1 is a 4011 CMOS 
   NAND gate (Radio Shack 276-2411). You can use an LM78L05 or LM430-5 for U2. Be sure that the shield of the cable (RG-174
   is suitable) connecting the marker output to pin 1 of the second mixer is grounded on both the oscillator and the TR boards. (Tnx
  Larry East,  W1HUE)

QRP – Projects:

· The MRX-40 Mini Receiver (advanced) (163,840 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1997, pp. 59-60
A tiny 40 meter amateur band Morse code receiver barely larger than a half dollar.
Rescaling the MRX-40 Receiver for 80 Meters
QST May 2001, pp. 98-99
Feedback: Rescaling the MRX-40 Receiver for 80 Meters
QST Jul 2001, p. 31

· An Automatic Sealed-Lead-Acid Battery Charger (members-only) (135,954 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 2001, pp. 43-47
Neat little charger that not only charges your Sealed Lead Acid batteries, but can keep them on trickle charge safely.

· The NJQRP Squirt (151,957 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 2001, pp. 40-43
A reduced-size 80-meter antenna designed for small lots, portable use, and a fine companion for QRP or the Warbler PSK31 Transceiver .

· A Simple 10-Meter QRP Transmitter (members-only) (413,364 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 2000, pp. 43-46
Take advantage of this 10-meter/QRP combo to get more miles per watt!

· Some QRP-Transmitter Design Tips (members-only) (373,796 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1988. Pp. 30-32
Full QSK is beneficial during QRP CW work. It is easy to achieve without relays at low power levels.

· Four Watt, QSK, for 24.9 MHz (members-only) (817,955 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST February 1986, pp. 23-26
Here's your chance to try the 24.9-MHz WARC band at minimum cost. This transmitter is a fine mate for the 24.9-MHz converter described in April 1985 QST.

· A Two-Transistor Transmitter for 30 meters (564,542 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1984, pp. 46-47, Hints and Kinks

· An Optimized QRP Transceiver for 7 MHz (1,424,733 bytes, PDF file)
ARRL Handbook 1993, pp. 30-37 to 30-40
Here is a rig that provides a real challenge for the QRP home builder. Nonetheless, this is a classic circuit and a favorite in the QRP community.

· A QRP SSB/CW Transceiver for 14MHz -- Part 1 (682,742 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1989, pp. 18-21
Exotic circuitry and hard to find components aren't necessary if you want to build excellent performance into a home-brew SSB/CW transceiver: Careful design is the key.

· A QRP SSB/CW Transceiver for 14MHz -- Part 2 (720,967 bytes, PDF file)
QST January 1990, pp. 28-31
W7ZOI rounds out his description of a 1- or 10-W SSB/CW rig with details on its transmitter, TR switching and optional speech processor.

· The QRP Three-Bander (members-only) (2,949,379 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1989, pp. 25-30
This low-power, direct-conversion CW trnsceiver covers 18, 21 and 24 MHz, and includes sidetone, spotting and relay-less full break-in --- all on one circuit board!

· A Balanced QRP Transmatch (members-only) (850,325 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
ARRL Handbook, 1990, pp. 34-19 to 34-20

· Build A Tuna-Tin 2 (1,870,395 bytes, PDF file)
QST May 1976, pp. 14-16
Ham radio lost its kick? Go QRP with this weekend project transmitter! WAS with a 40-meter half-watter? You betcha!

· The Tuna Tin 2 Today (168,122 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 2000, pp. 37-40
The revival of a legend
Note: the TT2 Kit is now available from the Ft Smith QRP Group.
Contact Jay Bromley W5JAY for details ( w5jay@alltel.net )

· The CB Slider (members-only) 1,811,747 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 1977, pp. 15-17
Would you like to operate the Tuna Tin Two but not crazy about crystal control? Heres the answer.

· The NORCAL SIERRA: An 80-15 Meter CW Transceiver (463,425 bytes, PDF file)
ARRL Handbook 1996, pp. 17.89-17.95
This project is available as a complete kit from Wilderness Radio.
Note: Suitable substitutes for C52 can be found at several suppliers.

· A Simple and Accurate QRP Directional Wattmeter (2,741,574 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1990, pp. 19-23, 36
A directional wattmeter that's simple, portable, and accurate from 10 watts down to 5 milliwatts!

· The Miracle Whip: A Multiband QRP Antenna (members-only) (113,933 bytes. PDF file) Members Only
QST July 2001, pp. 32-35
A small portable and inexpensive to make.

· QRP-France with a "Junk Box Shorty Forty" Antenna (members-only) (128,512 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST July 2001, pp. 66-68
A short center-loaded 40-meter dipole for portable QRP

· Updating the W1FB 80-Meter "Sardine Sender" (members-only) (187,658 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 2001, pp. 54-56
Build a “modern” version of this old classic QRP transmitter.
Feedback: March 2002, p. 42 – The value of capacitors C6, C8, C9 and C12 should be 0.1uF

QRP- Product Reviews and similar

Repeaters

· Using 1/2-Inch 75-Ohm CATV Hardline (members-only) (48,839 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 2000, p. 91 (World Above 50 MHz)
Consider using Hardline when planning a VHF/UHF repeater or even a home station.

· Repeaters -- what are they and how to use them (38,652 bytes, PDF file)

· Glossary of Repeater Terms (12,089 bytes, PDF file)

· Anatomy of a Repeater (members-only) (1,566,634 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST May 1995, pp. 69-71
FM hamming wouldn't be the same without these clever devices.

· How Are You Controlling Your Repeater? (members-only) (61,348 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST December 1999, pp. 81-82

· Crossband-Repeater Operation (members-only) (787,314 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST March 1993, pp. 43-46
Dual-band VHF/UHF rigs offer flexible operating capabilities.

· Selective Calling (members-only) (24,461 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
A collection of articles from QST on using CTCSS and DTMF for selective calling.

· VHF/UHF and Repeaters: The Basics (12,522 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1998, p. 93
Some repeater rules and regulations

· A Repeater Controller Accessory: The RCA (members-only) (428,198 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST February 2000, pp. 37-45
Although designed initially for use with repeaters, this flexible controller can be adapted to many other applications. Let your imagination be your guide!
Feedback (6,279 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST May 2000, p. 45

· Build a $60 Talking Repeater Controller (members-only) (151,289 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST February 1997, pp. 37-40
This inexpensive programmable controller features stored voice, simplex or duplex repeater control and low power consumption.

· Decoding the Secrets of CTCSS (members-only) 34,694 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST December 1996, pp. 55-56
While most rigs can send these low-frequency audio tones, decoding them is a handy trick, too!

· A Microprocessor-Controlled Repeater Voting System: The RVS-8 (members-only) (161,123 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST April 1996, pp. 38-43
You can add this flexible voting system to virtually any repeater!
Also see: RVS-8 Repeater Voter Audio-Amplifier IC Choice (members-only) (15,757 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST September 1996, p. 77, Technical Correspondence

· A Homebrew 2-meter Repeater (members-only) (917,784 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QEX February 1996, pp. 12-18
This design from the West Virginia Institute of Technology Amateur Radio Club uses off-the-shelf radios -- without modification.

· Beep... What Did That Repeater Say? (11,058 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1995, p. 75
A single tone is often the only thing standing between us and chaos.

· Beeper Madness (members-only) (132,971 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST May 1994, pp.86-87 (Hints and Kinks)
Here are two circuits for adding end-of-transmission beep to repeaters.

· Voice-Track--a Multifunctional, Talking Repeater Controller, Part 1 (members-only) (270,926 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST June 1995, pp. 27-32
With the Voice-Track, you can transform your repeater from commonplace to extraordinary.

· Voice-Track--a Multifunctional, Talking Repeater Controller, Part 2 (members-only) (87,218 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST July 1995, pp. 33-36
We wrap up our description of the Voice-Track. You'll learn about its programming mode, how to install Voice-Track in your repeater system and what to do to get it up and running.

· The RingMaster Ring Detector (members-only) (1,042,111 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST April 1994, pp. 40-42
In some areas, Caller ID can mean reduced security for repeaters controlled by phone lines. This circuit keeps hackers out.

· A Homemade Duplexer for 2-Meter Repeaters (members-only) (3,083,480 bytes, PDF file)Members Only
QST July 1972, pp. 22-26, 47
Build a six-cavity duplexer for use with a 2-meter repeater.

· I-Link, the .WAV of the Future (members-only) (360,796 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST march 2002, pp. 38-42
Hardware and software solutions to working world-wide DX on VHF/UHF

RFI – The RFI Home Page is an article in and of itself

RFI - Audio

RFI – Automotive ignition noise

RFI – Automotive

· Automotive Electric Motor and Fuel Pump Noise

· Automotive Interference Problems: What the Manufacturers Say

· Lab Notes -- Mobile Installations and Electromagnetic Compatibility (32,768 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1995, pp. 74-75

RFI – Cable TVI

RFI - Computer

RFI – Electric Fence

· Electric Fence Interference--A Case History ( 272,076 bytes, PDF file)
QST Apr 1996, pp.62-64
A case history of troubleshooting an electric fence -- or, watch yer step in the pasture.

· A Tale of QRN--Electric Fence Style (110,689 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 1975 Technical Correspondence, pp. 51, 65
Identifying and locating interference from a pest-control fence charger was only the beginning of the problem.

· An example of FCC action in the case of Electric Fence Interference

RFI – Electrical and Power Line

· A Simple TRF Receiver for Tracking RFI (206,906 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST March 2001, p. 32
Build this small receiver/antenna assembly to sniff out RFI sources.

· Basic Steps Toward Tracing and Eliminating Power-Line Interference (1,482,250 Bytes, PDF File)
QST November 1991, pp. 43-46

· A Line Noise Sniffer That Works (1,392,172 Bytes, PDF File)
QST September 1992, pp. 52-55

· How the FCC can Help with Power-Line Interference

· Cornering That Buzzing Interference (535,727 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1924, pp. 34-35
An early power line noise tracking experience from the earliest days.

· Power-Line Noise Mitigation Handbook for Naval and Other Receiving Sites

RFI – FCC Part 15 Rules

RFI – Info for the neighbors of hams

RFI – Intermodulation

· A Modern Urban Problem
August 1996 QST, "Intermod"

· A No-Tune 2-Meter Bandpass Filter (120,516 bytes, PDF file)
QST May 2000, pp. 54-55
A homebrew solution to annoying intermod.

RFI - Pacemakers

RFI – Regulatory Information

RFI – Telephone Interference

RFI – Television Interference

RFI – Touch Lamp and Dimmer

Safety

· ESD-Electrostatic Discharge - Part 1 (1,629,226 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1991, pp.19-21
Here's how electrostatic discharges are generated, how they affect electronic equipment, and what steps you can take to minimize ESD damage.

· ESD-Electrostatic Discharge - Part 2 (1,072,708 bytes, PDF file)
QST May 1991, pp. 28-29, 33
Is your workbench ESD safe? With a few inexpensive tools and proper precautions, it can be.

· Electrical Safety (739,200 bytes, PDF file)
The ARRL Antenna Book, 18th Edition, pp. 1-8 to 1-16

· The FCC's New RF-Exposure Regulations," by Ed Hare, W1RFI
QST, January 1997, pp 47-50
This article described the new rules, and the highlights of ARRL's petitions for change.

· "What's New About the FCC's New RF-Exposure Regulations," by Ed Hare, W1RFI
QST, October 1997, pp 51-52
ARRL tells hams about the rules changes and the availability of "Bulletin 65"

· "FCC RF-Exposure Regulations -- the Station Evaluation," by Ed Hare, W1RFI
QST, January 1998, pp 50-55.
This article describes Supplement B and tells hams how to use it to complete their station evaluations.

· RF Safety at Field Day (330,235 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 1999, pp. 48-51
A case study of Field Day with NSRC in a public park

· RF Exposure Regulations News
FCC Issues RF Safety Supplement B to OET Bulletin 65

· RF Exposure Station Evaluation and Exemption Worksheets
RF Exposure and You, pp. 1.2-1.5

· Dayton 2002 RF Safety Forum (588,056 bytes, PDF File)

Satellites:

· An Amateur Satellite Primer (212,925 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 2000, pp. 36-41
If you think you might like to work satellites but think it is difficult and expensive, this is a must read
(Note: This article contains a chart showing the Uplink and Downlink frequencies of several amateur satellites at the time of publication of the April 2000 QST. These frequency pairs can be reversed without notice by the control operator of the individual satellite. If you don't hear the signal near the Downlink frequency, you might want to check for the latest status at: http://www.amsat.org/amsat/news/ans.html )

· Lab Notes - Satellite-Tracking Software (229,376, PDF file)
QST December 1993, pp.89-90
The best way to find when a satellite is visible to your antenna is to use the software available for your computer.

· Working the EasySats (1,802,240 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1992, pp. 30-34
Maybe you've heard that satellite communication requires a huge investment in exotic equipment. Not so! Chances are you have everything you need to work a satellite right now!

· Working Satellite RS-12-The Ultimate Satellite Primer (425,984 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1994 pp.58-60, 64
This article is a primer for making your first satellite contact.

· The RS-12 Satellite
Tips for working DXCC on RS-12

· Those Keplerian Elements (196,608 bytes, PDF file)
Operating Manual 3rd Edition p. 13-19
What do those numbers mean?

· Loading ARRL Keplerian Bulletins into InstanTrack
Question submitted to the ARRL Technical Information Service

· Amateur Satellites: Frequencies and Modes

· A Simple Fixed Antenna for VHF/UHF Satellite Work (members-only) (501,974 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST August 2001, pp. 38-41
Work the low-earth orbiting satellites with this effective Turnstile Antenna system

· A Low-Loss VHF/UHF Bias Tee (members-only) (279,405 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QEX May/June 2002, pp. 52-54
A simple circuit that lets you superimpose DC control voltage onto the transmission line without altering the RF characteristics.

· An Inexpensive External GPS Antenna (253,745 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 2002, pp. 36-39
An easy to build antenna for your GPS unit for better reception.

· Satellite DXing "To Go" (members-only) (91,398 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST June 2002, pp. 40-43
Working the Amateur Satellites from a mobile.

· Getting Started with AMSAT-OSCAR 40 (88,957 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 2001, pp. 42-45

· Phase 3D-A Satellite for All!
QST May 1993, pp. 49-51 and January 1997, pp. 28-31
An introduction to the Phase 3D amateur satellite

· Get Ready for Phase 3D! - Part 1 (801,516 bytes, PDF file) B/W version (511,470 bytes)
QST January 1997, pp. 28-31
1997 will be the year Amateur Radio celebrates a new, powerful satellite. Will you be ready?

· Get Ready for Phase 3D! - Part 2 (416,491 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 1997, pp. 50-53
Setting up for 2 meters and 70 cm.

· Get Ready for Phase 3D! - Part 3 (424,080 bytes, PDF file)
QST March 1997, pp. 41-45
Conquering microphobia.

· Get Ready for Phase 3D! - Part 4 (292,893 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1997, pp. 45-47
Last month we challenged microphobia -- the irrational fear of microwave technology. If you thought that article was scary, brace yourself.

· Get Ready for Phase 3D! - Part 5 (343,935 bytes, PDF file) B/W version (185,498 bytes)
QST May 1997, pp. 28-30
Everything but the kitchen sink.

· OSCAR 40 on the Mode U/S--No Excuses! (325,389 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 2001, pp. 38-41
This article by the master of “How To”, WB8IMY, takes you step by step.

Science Fair/Merit Badge Projects:

· Code-Practice Oscillator (beginner) (393,216 bytes, PDF file)
ARRL Now You're Talking pp. 11-1 to 11-2
This is a complete oscillator that mounts on a small piece of wood. The circuit board for this project can be ordered from FAR Circuits. A complete parts kit, including circuit board, is available from the Hoosier Lakes Amateur Radio Club and from Jade Products.

· Suppliers mentioned in the article:

oFAR Circuits Contact Information

oHoosier Lakes Amateur Radio Club
PO Box 981
Warsaw, IN 46581-0981

· A Simple Regen Radio for Beginners
QST September 2000, pp 61-64
A good project for the beginner, a school science project and Scout Radio Merit Badge. The author after receiving correspondence has additional information he has graciously provided Notes. Authors Web page.
How to Tune In A Regenerative Receiver

· A CW Generator and Audio Distribution System for Students (101,888 bytes, PDF file)
QST February 2002, pp. 62-64
Up to eight students can copy CW at the same time.
Feedback: QST March 2002, p.42 – included in main article.

Software Defined Radio:

· The DSP-10: An All-Mode 2-Meter Transceiver Using a DSP IF and PC-Controlled Front Panel -- Part 1 (626,393 bytes, PDF file)
QST September 1999, pp. 33-41
What's neat about this 2-meter transceiver is that most of it is in software! Your PC is its front panel.

· The DSP-10: An All-Mode 2-Meter Transceiver Using a DSP IF and PC-Controlled Front Panel -- Part 2
QST October 1999, pp. 34-40
With most of the radio in software, the mechanical construction of the radio is much easier to handle.

· The DSP-10: An All-Mode 2-Meter Transceiver Using a DSP IF and PC-Controlled Front Panel -- Part 3 (2,108,685 bytes, PDF file)
QST November 1999, pp. 42-45
This is it! It's about time to put your new transceiver on the air.
Note: additional Web link
Kit available from TAPR

· A Panoramic Transceiving System for PSK31 (364,991 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 2000, pp. 31-37
Combine an inexpensive transceiver, some free software and you're on PSK31 at a rock-bottom price! Add to that the fun and pride of building the transceiver and you've got an irresistible package!

· A High-Performance, Single-Signal, Direct-Conversion Receiver with DSP Filtering (283,604 bytes, PDF file)
QST April 1998, pp. 40-43
Note: additional Web link
Articles referenced in the above article

oA High-Performance, Single-Signal, Direct-Conversion Receiver (5,424,060 bytes, PDF file)
QST January 1993, pp. 32-40

oHigh-Performance Direct-Conversion Receivers (8,168,925 bytes, PDF file)
QST August 1992, pp.19-28

· Signals, Samples and Stuff: A DSP Tutorial - Part 1 (1,013,741 bytes, PDF file)
QEX, March 1998, pp. 3-16
DSP is a buzzword for the '90s. Have you wonder what it's all about?

· Signals, Samples and Stuff: A DSP Tutorial - Part 2 (1,370,214 bytes, PDF file)
QEX, May 1998, pp. 22-37
Let's look inside an IF-DSP transceiver.

· Signals, Samples and Stuff: A DSP Tutorial - Part 3 (1,139,411 bytes, PDF file)
QEX, July 1998, pp. 13-27
Advances DSP techniques.

· Signals, Samples and Stuff: A DSP Tutorial - Part 4 (994,755 bytes, PDF file)
QEX, September 1998, pp. 19-29
Conclusion.

· A DSP-Based Audio Signal Processor
QEX September 1996, pp. 8-13

· Linux, Software Radio and the Radio Amateur (56,518 bytes, PDF file)
QST October 2002, pp. 33-35
How software radio technology might revitalize experimentation in Amateur Radio

· A Software-Defined Radio for the Masses, Part 1 (827,617 bytes, PDF file)
QEX Jul/Aug 2002, pp. 13-21
This series describes a complete PC-bases, software-defined radio that uses a sound card and an innovative detector circuit.

· A Software-Defined Radio for the Masses, Part 2 (411,179 bytes, PDF file)
QEX Sep/Oct 2002, pp. 10-18

UHF/Microwave

·       A Simple 5 band CW Transceiver by Rick Campbell KK7B (415,411 Bytes, PDF file)
Microwave Update, 1994, pp. 233-239
For 2.3, 3.4, 5.7, 10.3, and 24.2 GHz. Uses a pair of no-tune LOs, a simple HF receiver, a harmonic generator, and a harmonic mixer to form a simple narrowband transmitter and receiver.

VLF

· Lowfing on 1750 Meters (members-only) (123,799 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST October 1993, p.67-68
An introduction to an experimental band below the AM Broadcast band.

· Mother Nature's Radio (members-only) (273,999 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST January 1994, pp. 49-51
This is an introduction to the Earth's natural VLF radio emissions.

· Build Your Own Lowfer Transceiver (members-only) (742,965 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 1994, pp. 26-31
This article includes construction of the antenna.

· Exploring 136 kHz (members-only) 175,469 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST November 1998

· The Monster Loop (members-only) (188,363 bytes, PDFf file) Members Only
QST September 2000, pp. 38-40
Build a high performance VLF receiving antenna

· The AMRAD Active LF Antenna (members-only) ( 650,263 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST September 2001, pp. 31-37
This small state-of-the-art active receiving antenna works well on the MF and HF bands also.

· AMRAD Low Frequency Upconverter (members-only) (261,362 bytes, PDF file) Members Only
QST April 2002, pp. 34-39
This project will allow you to use your HF transceiver to listen to activity below 500 kHz.
Feedback: QST October 2002, p. 39

VHF and up Weak Signal Modes:

· A Basic Approach to Moonbounce (1,474,560 bytes, PDF file)
QST July 1985, pp. 18-21
Is moonbounce an esoteric mode beyond the reach of most amateurs? No! Recent advances in amateur equipment have brought EME even closer to the mainstream of Amateur Radio.

· WSJT: New Software for VHF Meteor-Scatter Communication (264,508 bytes, PDF file)
QST December 2001, pp. 36-41
Computer software helps to communicate by bouncing signals off the ionized trails of meteors.

· JT44: New Digital Mode for Weak Signals 58,459 bytes, PDF file)
QST June 2002, pp. 81-82